Camera works great. Takes amazing video and photos. You have to be very careful with that screen on the back though. I already shattered it by knocking over my tripod and it landed against a padded backpack hanging against my closet door. I have no idea how it shattered?? But lesson learned, be very careful with this one. I have since bought a neoprene case to put on it when not in use. I love the camera still. It is a great size and light weight, but a very solid and durable body. This combo is a great deal as well, saving you around $65-70. Would definitely recommend this camera to anyone.
It’s little sister, Adobe Premiere Elements provides a taste of what you can expect from Premiere Pro. It’s great for quick and easy DVD authoring, making professional-looking discs from the computer you’re using right now. It should be noted that the workflow is much different in Elements than Premiere Pro. Nevertheless, it teaches you the ins-and-outs of video editing by boiling it down to its most basic functions. Once you learn the basics, and feel like you’re ready to graduate to the full program, you can use transfer your Elements projects to Premiere Pro.
One of the cheaper options around ($49.99), Nero Video holds its own on this list—it comes well-stocked with a lot of the tricks and effects you’ll find among other products vying for video editing supremacy, and as far as software for beginners, you can certainly do worse. If you’re going to spend money learning how to edit videos, however, you might want to steer clear. Nero just doesn’t have the speed and functionality of some of the other products listed here, and if it’s value proposition is its price, $50 is still not all that cheap.  
Magix is a bit of a sleeper as far as movie editors go, and honestly it does fall short in some of the higher level features that you’ll find in the big dogs like Final Cut and Adobe Premiere. But let’s start with the basics of what makes it great for a beginner, and that’s the fact that, well, it handles the basics really well. First off, it’ll run on most modern Windows machines, up through Windows 10, which is great for beginners because those people most likely won’t have the budget or desire to shell out for a Mac. So it’s software that will work out of the box for your affordable Windows machine. According to their website, the software has been going strong for 15 years, delivering upwards of 93 percent customer satisfaction on its iterations.
First, I already kind of mentioned, but the grid view inside the viewfinder, they should give you options and the "thirds" grid should definitely be an option as the "rule of thirds" is a very good guide to follow in the absence of a clearer way to frame a photo. I hope in their future cameras they will have this. Or if somehow a firmware upgrade could add this, I'm not sure how hard-wired this grid is in the viewfinder if moving the lines would even be possible through software...
All the other tools you would expect from consumer-level video editing software are present and work excellently. You can add titles, closed captions and other text to your video project with a few simple clicks. You also get a video stabilizer that smooths out shaky video, as well as a library of over 500 effects and transitions for you to choose from.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
×