We created, exported and reviewed all of the results. We watched every video we made, looking for imperfections in the video and audio. Flaws such as pixelation, compression artifact, motion blur and more were present in most of the videos we examined, but they varied greatly depending on which program we used. Each program was given an A to F quality grade based on this evaluation.
iMovie is a free video creator for mac equivalent to the Windows Movie Maker. This software is included free on every new Mac and if you don`t have it you can download it on www.apple.com. This software is very easy to use, now you can organize all your clips and later turn them into a movie. When you import your clips iMovie will organize them by Events. You can add music background and add titles. There are also some templates you can use like Romantic Comedy, Epic Drama and Adventure. You can also choose from 19 audio effects and you can add jump or flip effects to match your music. The good side of this software is that it comes in many languages and it has simple interface, but on the bad side, it will take your time until you learn how to use it.
Support for 360-degree VR, 4K, Ultra HD and 3D media help round out the export opportunities available with Pro X10 and, while they may not all be supported by YouTube now, it’s good to know you have the capability for when they are. The user interface isn’t for beginners, but within a short amount of time, you’ll be a master at capturing, editing and sharing.
With the popularity of video content today, you'd think Microsoft would make a simple video editing tool even more prolific and available than they even had with Windows Movie Maker. Many times small business and particularly individuals, don't have the funds available for the more involved editing programs, or the time to learn those with huge learning curves to create even the simplest results.
Unlike some other users I found I could transfer to the computer without a problem through a USB interface even though I have a USB keyboard connected. Also I found that I could adjust contrast, brightness and color successfully and the quality of my videos were improved significantly. You do have to have the DVC connected with the source on when you load the "MovieStar" software to manipulate captured clips(I've no idea why...it's in there FAQ but can't find that in the manual)and I had to close out all the other running programs but Windows Explorer to make this work. This is on a machine running an ABIT BE6-II and an intel 700MHz CPU with 512Mb of ram.
BTW, for whatever the reason, Canon still does not include a lens hood with the bundle. A bit odd that. So factor in about $35 for that (note that the hood from the older 18-135mm lens included with the 70D won’t work, you’ll need the EW-73D). Plus don’t forget you should really add a UV filter to protect your lens. I recommend a 67mm B+W (Hoya is good too) which won’t break the bank.
Worst program I have ever used in my life. Randomly freezes, very picky with files, cant open the program if I close a video, cant save it as a movie... Icould go on. I looked up tons of things to try to fix this, and nothing works. I almost killed someone after how raged I was when I tried deleting the scene that kept freezing, but all that happened was a new scene would start freezing. Look for a different free program to downlaod.
The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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