Now one big question I know is on everyone's minds. APS-C or Full-Frame? Now the obvious answer is that if you're making money with the camera, go full-frame, if not, APS-C. But actually it's not that simple. First, there's no reason someone doing photography as a hobby shouldn't get a full-frame camera, other than the fact that they cost a whole lot more. But if you can afford it and you want the advantages of a full-frame camera (better resolutions, better low-light photography, etc.) and you don't mind the extra bulk, then why not? And on the flip-side, if you're a pro and want a smaller, less bulky camera to take with you on a shoot, then there's also no reason to say an APS-C camera will not be worth buying... But since you're looking at the T7i, let me go over a few actual advantages to an APS-C camera regardless of your status as an amateur or professional.

For the amateur video editor, all the functionality that's available can be a bit overwhelming. But if you're looking to produce truly professional-quality video -- without having to deal with watermarks -- Blender is a solid option. The best part: "You are free to use Blender for any purpose, including commercially or for education," according to its website. For the fine print, check out its licensing info.
Adding and arranging: When you're ready to make a movie, your first step will be to choose what type of files to add. Options include Video, Audio, Image, Icon, and Lyric. You can add any and all of these to the same project and then move them around on the Timeline until you have them where you want them. And if you're new to this type of program, there's a convenient Movie Wizard to guide you through the process.

Final Cut Pro: Offers speed and power for the new generation of video editors. The latest edition boasts a clean new look and a low-profile interface that increases work space. An interesting feature is the improved Magnetic Timeline 2 feature that offers flexible layouts based on roles and automatic color coding. The latest release is ideal for the new MacBook Pro as it supports wide color workflows and the Touch Bar.
The software that it came with is amazing, and works even better if you can use it correctly with Windows Movie Maker (save file as Windows Movie Maker, then import that file on Movie Maker, add effects, save, and import back to the Pinnacle software if you like). Or, if you don't want to use the Pinnacle software, that's fine too... just find on your computer where the file is saved at, and import that to whatever software you use. (As for Mac users, I suppose you could use garage band... I don't own a Mac so it would be difficult for me to say)
It gets to be somewhat annoying that after I use the software many times in a row, it becomes really slow. Let me give you an example: if I´ve edited around 10 videos in a row, then when I want to edit video 11, the software starts freezing, and when it finally starts working, it takes centuries for the video to be saved and downloaded successfully. I don´t know why this happens, but it would be great if Microsoft could check this issue.
One of the most beneficial factors of Movie Maker in the workplace is the possibility of making video presentations in record time, easy and with predesigned styles that make my work much easier and save me time. It helps my clients to better understand their completed projects and to process in a lighter and more dynamic way terms and modules that they do not handle.

For the most advanced, least fiscally prudent of beginners, there’s Apple Final Cut Pro X. $299.99 might be a little steep for a product you may well have a difficult time understanding; but for those among you who enjoy a challenge, and who aspire to some level of professionalism in video editing, why not go for it? Apple has made the transition from iMovie to Final Cut Pro more painless than ever—so if you’re the kind of guy or gal who enjoys him/herself an Apple product, and has worked with iMovie to the point of mastery, it might be time to splurge on Final Cut Pro. The power is still daunting; the interface, significantly less so.   
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.

After using the camera for a couple of weeks, I ordered the M-22mm lens and the EOS lens adapter. I have a couple of older small kit lenses with longer zooms that work well on the M6. And I wanted the 22mm prime for night/low-light shots. The M lenses are so light and tiny they're super-easy to carry around. I'm leaving in a few weeks for Japan and Korea and I'm looking forward to putting this camera through its paces. Plus, it weighs only about one-fourth of my 7D with lens but is capable of similar high quality photographs.
There are tons of in-program effects such as transitions, titles, credits, captions and even included audio scores, meaning you won’t get held up at any step of your editing process. There are panning and shift capabilities, high-quality post-processing zoom, as well as a plethora of color filtering plugins to give you the look you’ll need, even if the raw footage isn’t quite there. You’ll have the ability to export your movies in up to 4K resolution, and the software even supports 360-degree video projects. It’s a great powerhouse for beginners.
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