Clinton directs and shoots videos for Stark Insider. Recent projects include BTS short LUZIA with Cirque du Soleil, short film collection WHO IS STARK INSIDER?, and art-doc WRONG'S WHAT I DO BEST shot on location at the San Francisco Art Institute. His Broadway shorts, such as SHREK UNMASKED, have garnered acclaim. He's worked with DreamWorks, Disney on Ice, and "studied under" filmmaker Werner Herzog. He also writes on Stark Insider about the San Francisco arts scene, Napa, Silicon Valley and gadgets including camera gear. More about Clinton Stark: Bio | IMDB | Gear List
Finally, we used each program to compress a 4K video file into a smaller resolution. We then examined the results looking for imperfections in the picture such as compression artifacts, motion blur, distortion, ghosting and more. PowerDirector’s results were simply outstanding. We could find almost no indication that the video had been compressed, even when viewed on an ultra-high-definition monitor.

We also reached out to professionals who use video editing software on a regular basis and asked what aspects are most important to look for in consumer-level programs. Drew Tyler, instructor of digital media at Weber State University, told us there are two primary questions to answer: “Does it fit your eco system?” and “How much do you want to grow into the software?”


Other programs have jumped on board with 360 VR support, including Adobe Premiere, Apple Final Cut Pro X, and Magix Movie Edit Pro. Support varies, with some apps including 360-compatible titles, stabilization, and motion tracking. PowerDirector is notable for including those last two. Final Cut offers a useful tool that removes the camera and tripod from the image, often an issue with 360-degree footage.

This software gives me the ability to combine existing mini films, and merge them in unique and pleasant way so that I can create new engaging video material, and it´s really easy: all I have to do is open the software, then drag all of the videos I want to merge into Windows Movie Maker right box, then choose a couple of effects from the upper panel, then use the cropping tool to refine my new material, and that is all, I have a new video ready to be shared: I think that Windows Movie Maker is the easiest video editing tool you´ll ever find.


If you want something that is aimed more at the professional from a marketing standpoint, it couldn’t hurt to look into the Vegas Pro line. On its 15th iteration, Vegas has introduced a ton of new features, from hardware acceleration harnessing Intel QSV to a picture-in-picture OFX plug-in, all the way to a super intuitive new instant freeze frame option for referencing shots without stopping workflow. If you opt for the premium, upgraded package (which won’t run cheap), you’ll even get an exhaustive package of NewBlueFX fIlters to color your projects like a true Hollywood flick. What’s interesting about Vegas, and what we think gets overlooked, is they’ve attempted to give you an intuitive set of controls that takes the best of Final Cut, Premiere and others and merges them into one. Sure, it might not have the streamlined, Adobe CS-friendliness of Premiere, nor is it even compatible with Macs, but that’s OK. The workflow in this might just give certain users who can’t quite jive with the other guys a place to truly shine.

When asked if he had any advice for newbie editors learning the software, he recommended third-party resources. “Classes are great if they’re available and affordable,” Dutcher said. He also advised new video editors to “buy the manuals that are not published by the software companies, such as 'Final Cut Pro for Dummies,' because they’re written by actual users, and written in language that’s more accessible.”

I love movie maker. I have zero background editing videos. I can use files from my phone or my camera and upload them. I can lay over a recorded audio or song recorded with the regular voice recorder on my phone. And can add transitions just as easy as a PowerPoint. Exports into several different file types, all labeled by program. For example- YouTube channel video, face book video, emailing, etc


When it comes to video editing nobody wants to spend hours mastering nuances of video cutting techniques. All we usually need is to place several pieces together, add some fade-ins and outs, include subtitles and do this with as little efforts as possible. At the same time nobody wants to compromise with the final quality of the video. Indeed, simple not necessarily should mean primitive. VSDC Free Video Editor is a simple and easy to use video editor featuring a lot of functions even a pro editor wouldn't be ashamed of.
Building a DVD from the ground up can be difficult and time-consuming, and the best DVD creators makes it as easy as possible to use their features and tools. Some programs build tutorials directly into their interfaces, while others have free lessons, guides and forums on their official websites.  Additionally, many of the programs we reviewed have free trials, which you can use to determine if the application suits your needs before you pay.  
After struggling with GoPro Studio's constant glitches and quirkiness, I finally got fed-up enough to search for an editor that fits my needs. For me that was something simple, reliable and actually usable. I didn't need a lot of features yet, just a means of basic editing without freezing-up. Very reliable! Two things I noticed that were minor issues for me: 1. - audio/video syncing during editing/preview was an issue that was solved by rendering often, 2. - I'd like the fade transition to be more smooth and adjustable but maybe I have to look into this a bit more. Overall a pleasure to use. I actually look forward to using it compared to the dread I felt using GoPro Studio, which isn't even available to download any more. Another appropriate review I read of GoPro Studio was that it was free, powerful and dysfunctional.
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
You can easily add video clips by browsing for videos and audios by using the corresponding button on the timeline. You can also permanent Add videos and photos button on the Home tab. The “Import from Device” option in the File Menu where one can open the Windows Video/Photo importer which allows you to apply keyword tags and saving the images and clips in an organized fashion.
The app sounds handy for people who are already doing these things. But the bigger story might just be that Facebook is trying to show it cares about the community of independent vloggers. The same people who this app is designed to appeal to are currently struggling with odd changes and errors over at YouTube. Facebook has wanted to poach them for years now. One app isn’t going to suddenly change things, but a continued commitment could help win people over.
The only advantage of Windows Movie Maker over Filmora is that Windows Movie Maker is free. Though you need to pay for Filmora, the available features make it really worth the money. With all of these features, and many more, it is quite easy to see why Wondershare Filmora has taken over as the new No. 1 video editing software choice. Why don't give it a shot and download it now?
In our tests, we timed how long it took to install each application, import and organize video files, build a test video and menu, burn a disc, and more. We found that programs that take even a few minutes longer than other applications to complete simple tasks can end up adding hours to the total process. The best DVD authoring programs run fast and save that extra time you would otherwise spend babysitting a progress bar.
Building a DVD from the ground up can be difficult and time-consuming, and the best DVD creators makes it as easy as possible to use their features and tools. Some programs build tutorials directly into their interfaces, while others have free lessons, guides and forums on their official websites.  Additionally, many of the programs we reviewed have free trials, which you can use to determine if the application suits your needs before you pay.  

Another hidden "cost" is periodic or even constant in-line advertising or reminders that an upgrade is available. Our favorite program, HitFilm, never pushes an upgrade on you, but it makes you go through a social media and authorizing song and dance to download the product or switch computers. VideoPad (on the Mac) makes you verify at every launch that you are using the free version for noncommercial purposes.


Although it’s said to created intros for video ads or promo videos with logo stingers, I see no reason it’s only for a particular user. With Intro Video Creator, you can hold your customers till the end of your videos and maximize your video ads. But if you’re not a vendor, or an affiliate, you can still try this amazing product to make intros for personal uses. It will be the savior for your boring presentation.
Windows Video Maker is an easy-to-use solution ideal for beginners. Although the program is offered for free and come standard on virtually every windows PC, it provides all the basic features for a perfect introduction. The software utilizes the most common workflow elements of the professional video editing systems. However, it offers an intuitive interface that is easy to navigate even for the novice editors. The interface provides a simplified version of a standard video editor timeline. The timeline features clips that are characterized by Long thumbnails and ease of use.
Unlike some other users I found I could transfer to the computer without a problem through a USB interface even though I have a USB keyboard connected. Also I found that I could adjust contrast, brightness and color successfully and the quality of my videos were improved significantly. You do have to have the DVC connected with the source on when you load the "MovieStar" software to manipulate captured clips(I've no idea why...it's in there FAQ but can't find that in the manual)and I had to close out all the other running programs but Windows Explorer to make this work. This is on a machine running an ABIT BE6-II and an intel 700MHz CPU with 512Mb of ram.
Being a YouTube creator is hard. When you're not getting subscribers nor views on your videos, it's easy to feel discouraged, disappointed, frustrated, and quit. Yes, YouTube is hard and there's a lot you need to learn in order to grow a successful YouTube channel, including video editing, audience growth, storytelling, video production, business development, and more. But when you have a mission that's bigger than all that, the motivation to keep going can be stronger than all the struggles and difficulties in the process. This is how I stay motivated on YouTube and don't quit despite the struggles.
I'll keep this short ... despite a bad review on Amazon, I bought this product. I received it promptly, I installed the highly regarded Pinnacle Studio v14 software FIRST, on my computer, AS INSTRUCTED. I connected the Canon DV tape camcorder to the Dazzle with the 'AV Out' cable that came with the camcorder originally, plugged the Dazzle into a front-mounted USB port on the computer, launched Studio, and imported 6 year old video from tape to disk by simply hitting the 'play' button on the camcorder ... I have a lot more work to do for video editing, but this beats the HELL out of installing a machine specific capture card. I can't think of a simpler way to capture tape-based video. You can pick from a variety of file outputs, I used AVI and I'll probably experiment more and use whatever burns to DVD the best for HD tv viewing. I was dreading the pain of capturing old video, but this has made it much easier than I expected, at a very reasonable cost considering the hardware/software package you get. In fact, it works well enough that I'm willing to stick with my DV tape camera for a while longer. More importantly I have old but good quality video of family, dogs and fun that I can now capture and save to DVD.
It splits its interface into two modules: Express and Advanced. These two modes function similar to the storyboard and timeline modes most other software use. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll be pleased with the quality of the transitions and effects the software has to help you create videos. Nero Video also supports third-party add-ons. However, it doesn't provide many exporting options, so check that it supports the formats you want to use before you buy. Also, even though this DVD authoring software comes with dozens of transitions, text effects and other effects, it doesn't have as many as other products we reviewed. Still, there may be enough for your needs. This application can create chapters automatically, and you can also insert music and voiceovers. When importing files, you can capture video, audio and images from your computer or any device you connect to it. Before you take the time to burn your project to a disc, you can use the playback option to see how it will work. This DVD authoring software can burn your movies to DVD, AVCHD, CD and Blu-ray discs, as well as save files on your computer or upload them to the internet.
Export options: Another area where free meets inconvenience may be at the tail end of the project, when you want to export your video, only to discover that the free version will not output to your desired format. Before you start using a free package, make sure that it will save your video to the platform and resolution you need, whether your video will eventually wind up on YouTube or on a Blu-ray disc.
iMovie is a free video creator for mac equivalent to the Windows Movie Maker. This software is included free on every new Mac and if you don`t have it you can download it on www.apple.com. This software is very easy to use, now you can organize all your clips and later turn them into a movie. When you import your clips iMovie will organize them by Events. You can add music background and add titles. There are also some templates you can use like Romantic Comedy, Epic Drama and Adventure. You can also choose from 19 audio effects and you can add jump or flip effects to match your music. The good side of this software is that it comes in many languages and it has simple interface, but on the bad side, it will take your time until you learn how to use it.

On the nikon side you might looking at the Nikon D3400 or the Nikon D5600. Both of these cameras were released last year and they’re both very nice. The D5600 is the most similar and also has a fully articulating screen. If you’ve never used a nikon dslr before it might take you a little while to get used, but again both of these cameras are quite good although I would still give the advantage to the T7i.

The swivel LCD is another great feature, although not new, my T3i had it, but still worth a mention. One difference, think starting with the T6i, is the LCD is now also a touchscreen. Although I turned mine off because I don't want to accidentally change anything since a lot of things can touch the screen, from my hands to my nose... I'd rather use the buttons which have a lot less chance of accidental activation. But I know everyone has been conditioned to love touchscreens, so it's there, hooray. :-)
I've been using Canon equipment for decades. I am a photo 'enthusiast' but hardly a pro-style photog. I have used various film cameras, several Canon Rebels, EOS 7D mark 1 and mark 2 plus several 'L' lenses. All that time, I've been searching for the perfect travel camera -- I don't think it exists. I've used many small digital snappers including the Sony RX100-II, which took nice photos but was maddeningly fussy to hold and use, as well as the Fuji XT100 (great camera but fixed 40mm-equiv lens).
This open-source software program runs smoothly with Windows 10. It has a very user-friendly interface makes navigating the program easy for those with a little experience in video editing. Your files can even be extended using third-party video filters and it supports batch processing which means it is possible to handle multiple videos at the same time. Unfortunately, even with its friendly interface, this program can be a little difficult to understand for beginners.
There are so many different video formats out there, and one device may capture in a different format than another. Furthermore, different devices and platforms need specific file formats for playback—and those formats may be different than what your camera captures! That means you’ll want software that can import from a variety of sources and that will support many file formats for export.
So you might be a little intimidated by the idea of a DSLR with the different lenses and the switches and the buttons and you were probably hearing me and others rant about the ISO, APS-C, aperture, etc. and wondered what the heck that is and why they are good or bad... Well, completely understandable. And while I recommend reading some good books on the topic (Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is an excellent one BTW), this phone has a new feature that is sure to make the transition a lot easier and less intimidating. Now the default LCD information view shows like a feature guide. Basically when you select a mode on the knob, the LCD will actually display an easy to understand summary of what that mode is called and basically what it means for your photo. Sometimes with some basic graphics to represent the differences. I turned this off and is using the old-style view, not because I'm a snob, but because I have used DSLRs before and have a little technical experience with it to know what they mean. The guided view is just too bright and I like the dark theme of the standard information view. But this new way of showing the different modes is actually quite awesome if you're just starting out with DSLR photography.
There are like a million features in this phone, so I think I'm going to stop listing them one-by-one here and instead point out one more that I think can make the difference between for someone who is unsure of the camera. I think one major reason someone would be unsure enough to be reading this long review before buying this, is actually someone who is thinking about getting this as a first DSLR. Meaning you've either only used point-and-shoot cameras, or even worse, you've only used your cell phone... lol. :-P

At the higher end of the Corel product line is Pinnacle Studio—which, at $129.95 (the amount you’ll need to pay to edit 360-degree and 4k content with the “Ultimate” version), costs more than twice as much as VideoStudio. What do you get for the extra money? Well, not only does Pinnacle come readily equipped with all the features you’d expect from an upper-echelon product—motion tracking, 360-degree VR support, 4k support, multi-cam, etc.—but you’d be hard-pressed to find a faster product on the market in terms of rendering.
Many independent vendors, who are often sole proprietors in charge of the software, make themselves available to users via social media and email to assist with problems, troubleshoot, take suggestions and criticism, and otherwise oversee the software. Programs with intuitive interfaces and tool-tip hints, and even built-in tutorials to greet new users, make free software popular.

You can choose among a few different speeds, and the app will show you how long the hyperlapsed video will be for every speed in comparison to the length of the video in real time. (So a 40-second video in real time will become roughly a seven-second video in Hyperlapse at 6X speed.) It's a really cool way to capture something that usually lasts a while -- like a sunset or an event setup.
Apple’s Final Cut Pro X software falls into what we call the “prosumer” category because it treads the line between a product for consumers who want to up their video-editing game and one for professionals who need powerful editing tools. It lacks a traditional timeline-track interface, which is enough to scare some users off, but the software is intuitive and powerful nonetheless. It has great organizational tools like libraries, ratings, tagging, auto analysis for faces and scenes, and automatic color coding for track-specific clips, useful keyboard short-cuts and drag-and-drop media importing give Adobe’s Premiere Elements a run for its money. Unfortunately, you can't directly open projects from Final Cut Pro 7 or earlier, but there are many third-party plug-ins that will help you out there.​
The set of features provided in Windows Movie Maker is, yet again, quite modest. You can use only a handful of effects and transitions there, compared to the impressive collection offered in Movavi Video Editor Plus. The same goes for title presets. When you edit your projects, whether at home or in the office environment, you’d probably want a bit more room for creativity. This is precisely what is available to Movavi users, together with handy features like callouts, auto adjustment, and timeline mode.

Creating a new video from existing ones becomes really easy by using Windows Movie Maker. It gives me the ability to prepare, edit, and deliver videos to my audience and clients, and they really love the material I deliver. I simply thin that the best thing freelancers can do is to communicate what their service is about with an awesome and engaging video.
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