Main features: Make YouTube video from various media files, include any formats video/movie files, audio/music files, photo/picture files. Batch Upload lots of various videos onto youtube with right profile. Batch Convert lots of various videos to right profile then upload onto youtube. Record/Capture videos from computer screen, video device, camera. high efficiency and high quality. Record/Capture audios from any audio input pin or any audio device, like microphone. Provides many video/audio editing features, such as cut, crop, trim, split, merge, rotate, speed up/slow down, add/mix musics/audios, join video clips together, mix multiple videos on one screen, videos in video, pictures in picture, add cool font texts, add special effects, add transition effects, add action/animation, add video shapes, video chroma Key, take snapshots, beautify video. Provide hundreds of special effects and transitions, make your videos more polished with special effects. Timeline Edit Mode allows you to arrange videos, pictures, audios and texts using a timeline, this will help you to add action, effects, titles and background music at just the right moment easy. Built-in Lyrics video maker, help you easy to make wonderful lyrics video. Built-in Karaoke video maker, help you easy to make wonderful Karaoke video. Supports all YouTube 4K, 2K, HD, and SD video profiles, easy to make the video to be the best effect for YouTube. Manage and Promote the YouTube videos. Support CPU multi-core technology to optimize performance. Hardware Acceleration. 32bit and 64bit Windows Optimize.
In the production industry, when most people think about editing software, their minds don't go to Windows Movie Maker on a PC. I'm not an expert on how to achieve that, but I gather a revamped look (which seems more like a professional editing suite) that retains the intuitive, user-friendly feel would be a start. The issue may not be with Movie Maker, but more so a computer's ability to handle the rich files (raw video) and storage required to edit.
We created, exported and reviewed all of the results. We watched every video we made, looking for imperfections in the video and audio. Flaws such as pixelation, compression artifact, motion blur and more were present in most of the videos we examined, but they varied greatly depending on which program we used. Each program was given an A to F quality grade based on this evaluation.
This video editor gives you tons of control and editing power, but you'll have to know how to use it. The program could use a manual to help novice users comb through all of the features. Without that, VSDC Free Video Editor will take a lot of experimenting or previous editing know-how to figure out. It's worth spending plenty of time with, though.
I'm in the market for a free or inexpensive movie editor. I am hoping to find editing software that allows you to attach audio clips to still photos or video clips. Imagine that you have 20 vacation photos each playing for 5 seconds. You add audio to describe each photo. Then, you drag the 3rd photo to the 11th position. I need (want) an editor that will drag your audio along with the photo. In Windows Movie Maker when you moved a photo the audio did not drag along with it.

After testing six of the most popular free editing suites, our top choice is HitFilm Express 9 for its lavish cinematic capabilities and high-powered interface. For Mac owners, Apple's iMovie is the no-brainer choice, because of its macOS integration, top-notch output, professional themes and trailers, and support for professional shooting and editing techniques. For YouTube and other social media platforms, the free, cross-platform VideoPad is the best option.

The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.

×