Start your quest for the best video editing software by signing up for the free trial or demo offered by popular video editing software providers. This will enable you to test drive each application’s top features free of cost, do a general comparison, and gauge their suitability for your purposes. Start by visiting the websites of the following leading tools to check the possibility of availing a free trial: Adobe Premiere Pro, CyberLink PowerDirector, Pinnacle Studio Ultimate, and Final Cut Pro. These programs have received high rankings in our video editing software reviews, so check them out. 
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
Crank things up a notch to Adobe Premiere Pro CC and get an all-singing all-dancing video editor that's used by multitudes of industry professionals. And it's easy to see why it's so popular for Windows 10 users – it can handle an uncapped amount of video tracks, which can be imported from pretty much any source you can think of: files, tapes, cameras of all standards, and even VR. The automatic sync is a gem when you have multi-angle shots, and it's hard to fault the fine-tuning tools that really make your video stand out from the crowd.
BTW, for whatever the reason, Canon still does not include a lens hood with the bundle. A bit odd that. So factor in about $35 for that (note that the hood from the older 18-135mm lens included with the 70D won’t work, you’ll need the EW-73D). Plus don’t forget you should really add a UV filter to protect your lens. I recommend a 67mm B+W (Hoya is good too) which won’t break the bank.

There are the times when you just want to edit a video -- no fancy collages and no splicing. For that, there's InShot, a handy app that lets you trim, speed up, or add music and filters to video. It's pretty fundamental, but with that comes a high ease of use. You can also add a background, if you like, though we think it's pretty cool to have an overlap of images, like we did with the video below.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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