So you might be a little intimidated by the idea of a DSLR with the different lenses and the switches and the buttons and you were probably hearing me and others rant about the ISO, APS-C, aperture, etc. and wondered what the heck that is and why they are good or bad... Well, completely understandable. And while I recommend reading some good books on the topic (Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is an excellent one BTW), this phone has a new feature that is sure to make the transition a lot easier and less intimidating. Now the default LCD information view shows like a feature guide. Basically when you select a mode on the knob, the LCD will actually display an easy to understand summary of what that mode is called and basically what it means for your photo. Sometimes with some basic graphics to represent the differences. I turned this off and is using the old-style view, not because I'm a snob, but because I have used DSLRs before and have a little technical experience with it to know what they mean. The guided view is just too bright and I like the dark theme of the standard information view. But this new way of showing the different modes is actually quite awesome if you're just starting out with DSLR photography.
For the amateur video editor, all the functionality that's available can be a bit overwhelming. But if you're looking to produce truly professional-quality video -- without having to deal with watermarks -- Blender is a solid option. The best part: "You are free to use Blender for any purpose, including commercially or for education," according to its website. For the fine print, check out its licensing info.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
More options when exporting. Possibility to change the Movie Maker mode from "Beginner" that includes todays Movie Maker functionality to "Expert" that will offer the video editing functionality for the experienced users. Like this this tool can be used by both beginners and experienced users. Because today the experienced users try to avoid Movie Maker. "Beginner" and "Expert" Movie Maker modes could increase the target group of the Movie Maker users.
The easiest way to get video clips into Movie Maker is to tap the "Click here to browse for videos and photos" button in the main timeline area. There's also a permanent Add videos and photos button on the Home tab. Each button opens the Pictures library, where most people's point-and-shoot videos land when they import from camera media. There's also an "Import from Device" choice in the File menu; this just opens the Windows photo/video importer, which actually does a decent job of letting you apply keyword tags and saves the image and clips to date-and-time-organized folders—not unlike iPhoto's "Events." And finally, you can start capturing video from your PC's webcam.
Taking a vacation this summer to the shore, overseas, a theme park, or somewhere exotic, like Cleveland? There's a good chance you're going to want to film some of your trip. But instead of letting it languish on your smartphone, DSLR or compact camera, you'll want to polish it up to share with family and friends. That's where a good video editing program comes in.
The second big draw is communication. The app creates a unified inbox for comments on Facebook and Instagram and messages from Messenger, so that you don’t have to bounce between different apps in order to respond to people. The app doesn’t seem to cover every possible messaging vector inside of Facebook’s services, but it sounds like a handy start. <<
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