Corel VideoStudio has all the characteristics of the other top-of-the-line products on this list, including 360-degree VR and 4k support, but it also has the distinction of being the first piece of consumer video editing software to offer motion tracking—which, if you’re not already familiar, is a feature that allows you to track specific objects throughout your cut (if you wanted, say, to point an arrow at one of your characters, blur out his face, or bestow him with a funny hat). Most of the products on this list come equipped with motion tracking, but VideoStudio still boasts one of the best motion tracking systems around.

We host professional development events for faculty members at our university and not everyone who is interested in each event is able to attend. With Movie Maker, we are taking our recordings of the live event, editing out the pre- and post-workshop conversations and any dead time during the event (i.e., individual activities), and making the recordings available to all faculty members (and graduate students). These events (both live and archived) are playing a role in increasing faculty members' activity and development.
Notable features include professional-level color correction, GPU-accelerated real-time effects, video capture, and nearly all-encompassing format support. However, the free version is only capable of exporting MPEG-4 files with a resolution of up to 720p. Thankfully, Lightworks also offers traditional tools for importing, trimming, and seamlessly weaving audio and video together with a few effortless mouse clicks.
When it comes to video editing nobody wants to spend hours mastering nuances of video cutting techniques. All we usually need is to place several pieces together, add some fade-ins and outs, include subtitles and do this with as little efforts as possible. At the same time nobody wants to compromise with the final quality of the video. Indeed, simple not necessarily should mean primitive. VSDC Free Video Editor is a simple and easy to use video editor featuring a lot of functions even a pro editor wouldn't be ashamed of.
What I liked the most is the video editing because even if you are new to all of this, it will be easy for you to follow the tutorial and be as professional as all the other video editors. There is nothing complicated in the program, I've tried many other video editing programs, but this one by far the easiest of all and still give you the most satisfying results.

One of the things I really like about working in Movie Maker is that most of the effects, transitions, and themes preview automatically when you just hover the mouse cursor over their buttons. Another plus is the undo and redo buttons are right up top—video editing is a very trial-and-error process—but I suppose it's too much to ask for a history window in such a simple application.
It´s a pleasure that Windows Movie Maker is really easy to use. What I mostly love about this free software is that it allows me to drag and drop pieces of videos that I have inside it, and then it lets me edit them and join them easily. I also love the upper menu that allows me to add text, music, and even effects (such as HQ video image and Black and White "textures"), by only clicking once on the desired option. I really think that editing videos is super easy when I use Windows Movie Maker.
The best advice I can gie you is that you need to solve the issue that appears when you merge images with videos. Let me be clearer with this: if you use the merging effect (for intros and outros) and you use this option when you marge the last part of the video with a new image placed at the end of the same video, the moment when the video is blurring and the image appears, you can see half of the image on the top of the screen, and half of the video on the bottom of the screen. This only happens when you use this option at the end of your work,
So—we stretched the meaning of “software” a bit earlier; now, we’re going to stretch the meaning of “beginner.” We included CyberLink PowerDirector on this list because its interface is, at the end of the day, pretty straightforward. Head to the product page, run through the tutorials, and you’ll be alright. There is within the interface, however, an embarrassment of options and effects. If you’re not willing to invest the time in learning all of them, it can get a bit overwhelming. 

This program checks in at about 26MB, which isn't gigantic, but is still relatively large. For that, you'll get a program that is a dead ringer for professional editing programs. It has the same sort of timeline editing style that lets you combine multiple cuts, add transitions, and render them into a complete project. As such, it isn't very easy to use unless you really know what you're doing. Few things are labeled or intuitive, and all of your tools are spread out across multiple menus. If you can find the features, there are plenty of ways to cut, reshape, and modify your video's picture and audio, though. You can even kick the quality up to 30 FPS and 1080p HD. VSDC Free Video Editor supports just about every video format you can think of, so you'll have no problem turning any video into a project.
The last downside, and perhaps the biggest one for some people, is the lack of 4K video recording. It's kind of a disappointment that phones can do it now but this DSLR still cannot. There are some comparably priced DSLRs from Nikon and others like Sony that have this feature. But honestly, even without this I will still prefer to stay with Canon simply because your camera is only as good as your lens, and Canon has probably the best lenses out there, but definitely without question has the widest selection of lenses to choose from.
The only advantage of Windows Movie Maker over Filmora is that Windows Movie Maker is free. Though you need to pay for Filmora, the available features make it really worth the money. With all of these features, and many more, it is quite easy to see why Wondershare Filmora has taken over as the new No. 1 video editing software choice. Why don't give it a shot and download it now?
Whether you’re a professional video editor or an amateur, video is a universal way to enjoy, share and create memories that can last forever. No matter if you’re capturing life’s best (and worst) moments via a smartphone, DSLR or even a point-and-shoot camera, editing video will allow you to highlight and share the footage with the world. Which video editor you use to ship your final product is best determined by your needs, the type of computer you own and, of course, your budget. With those factors in mind, here’s our take on the best video editors available today.
However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.
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