The Powershot GX 3 I purchased to backup my EOS 7D Mark II didn't work out because of the steep drop-off in IQ. I decided to give the EOS M6 a try after reading up on mirrorless cameras, and noting that the M6 sports an APS-C sensor. I took it for a shoot at a botanical garden the day after receiving it, and I'm generally pleased with the results. I shot mainly with the EF-M 18-150mm lens, and I made sparing use of the EF-M 11-22. Both lenses produced some decent shots, and they kept the overall size and weight of my gear down. I've humped the 7DMKII with a Sigma 50-150mm lens, and I'm inclined to forgive a small dropoff in IQ in return for a much smaller, lighter kit. The M6 may struggle to backup to the 7DMKII for action shots. The 7DMKII focuses more quickly and rattles off 10 frames in the blink of an eye. That said, the M6 did a creditable job of capturing a macro shot of a flower-hopping Bumble Bee (photo attached). It's going to take time to get used to using the tilt screen instead of a viewfinder for composing shots, but it became more comfortable the more I shot. Bright sunlight is a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. The tilt screen also helped in framing close to the ground shots without having to dig my knees in the dirt. Time will tell, but first impressions of the M6 are quite positive.
At the higher end of the Corel product line is Pinnacle Studio—which, at $129.95 (the amount you’ll need to pay to edit 360-degree and 4k content with the “Ultimate” version), costs more than twice as much as VideoStudio. What do you get for the extra money? Well, not only does Pinnacle come readily equipped with all the features you’d expect from an upper-echelon product—motion tracking, 360-degree VR support, 4k support, multi-cam, etc.—but you’d be hard-pressed to find a faster product on the market in terms of rendering.
So you might be a little intimidated by the idea of a DSLR with the different lenses and the switches and the buttons and you were probably hearing me and others rant about the ISO, APS-C, aperture, etc. and wondered what the heck that is and why they are good or bad... Well, completely understandable. And while I recommend reading some good books on the topic (Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is an excellent one BTW), this phone has a new feature that is sure to make the transition a lot easier and less intimidating. Now the default LCD information view shows like a feature guide. Basically when you select a mode on the knob, the LCD will actually display an easy to understand summary of what that mode is called and basically what it means for your photo. Sometimes with some basic graphics to represent the differences. I turned this off and is using the old-style view, not because I'm a snob, but because I have used DSLRs before and have a little technical experience with it to know what they mean. The guided view is just too bright and I like the dark theme of the standard information view. But this new way of showing the different modes is actually quite awesome if you're just starting out with DSLR photography.
Now back to the T7i, it has Canon's latest DIGIC processor inside of it, think it is up to 7 now. The auto focus system is a dual pixel AF with phase detection which is great. My old T3i didn't have phase detection, and the way that helps is that when something is out of focused, the camera can now tell which direction it needs to go. Before the camera basically had to guess and if it got less focused, it'll then go the other way. So sometimes it'll go the right direction the first time, other times it'll have to go both ways before it finds the right direction. This sometimes meant getting the subject focused took quite some time. With this new dual pixel with phase detection, it not only knows which way to go, but it also locks into focus much quicker than before. Phase detection has been around for a few years, but the dual pixel CMOS AF is actually new, even to the pro-grade cameras, and it made its way to this prosumer grade camera which is really nice.

There´s a slight issue with my Windows Movie Maker. Every time that I place an image at the end of the video, and merge it with the end of a video, the image breaks in half at the end. This happens all the time, with all the versions I´ve tried. But if you avoid merging an image with a video at the end of your scene, then you won´t have to worry about this issue.
PowerDirector Ultra features CyberLink’s True Theater Color technology, which analyzes the color of your footage and enhances aspects like hue, saturation and brightness. It's a great way to get Hollywood-style color treatment on your video project. You get more than enough tools to create a video that looks like it could have been made in a movie studio. You may never edit a full-length feature film with this software, but you could.
I have used Movie Maker mostly for small projects, prototypes and home movies. It is a great and simple tool that meets 75% of most users needs. It is not advanced, so not many professional movie maker options are available (like color correction, white balancing, etc.) However, for basic video that you'll probably want to upload to you tube, this is a pretty good tool. Love the simple and easy to use interface.

You’ll find the familiar timeline/storyboard workflow, along with other basic tools such as titles and credits, effects and transitions, and a chroma-key (green screen). It also has some, but not all, of the advanced tools you need to make an outstanding video. You’ll get a video stabilizer to smooth out shaky footage, 4K compatibility for footage from the newest cameras, 3D editing, motion tracking and more. These are all great tools, and it’s a great bang for your buck. But there are some significant trade-offs. For example, there are no themes or templates. So, you’ll need to build every project from scratch – not very appealing to beginners. It also lacks an automatic video creator and slideshow creator, which are also great for novices. This program lacks multi-cam and 360-degree editing features that you would find on more expensive programs. If you want the newest, greatest effects and tools, this is not the program for you. In addition, the program’s interface is in bad need of a face-lift, and has been for years. It’s kind of hard to get around, and it will require working through a few projects before you can use it effectively.
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.

The Dazzle Multimedia DM4100 Digital Video Creator is very useful to import video from your TV, VCR or DVD player into your PC for editing and then converting to PC video formats. The device is exceptionally good for making videos for use on the Web or as e-mail attachments. Thanks to its use of USB its very simple to install and can be "hot-swaped" with other USB device without rebooting your computer.
EDIUS Pro 8 handles more formats and more resolutions in real-time than any other NLE. With EDIUS, you really can Edit Anything, Fast - the perfect tool for any fast turnaround production, including broadcast news and same day event videography. EDIUS also comes with the GV Browser media management application to prepare content for subsequent editing in EDIUS. With EDIUS Pro 8, there are no subscription fees — you buy it, you keep it — with a permanent license with free updates throughout the life of EDIUS Pro 8.x.
One thing that I didn’t mention before was that the Rear LCD Screen is also a touch screen. Now this might seem like a big deal but it really does make using the camera a breeze. Rather than having to use the dial on the side here to change your settings, you can simply use your finger to quick change what you want. It’s very similar to using your phone and it’s also very responsive. Sure it might seem like a beginners feature, but I’ve found myself using it a lot to move quickly though the menus. Not only, now that the Canon T7i has it’s new dual pixel autofocus system, you can simply touch on the screen where you want it to focus and it will quickly and cinematically come into to focus. It’s great.

If you want something that is aimed more at the professional from a marketing standpoint, it couldn’t hurt to look into the Vegas Pro line. On its 15th iteration, Vegas has introduced a ton of new features, from hardware acceleration harnessing Intel QSV to a picture-in-picture OFX plug-in, all the way to a super intuitive new instant freeze frame option for referencing shots without stopping workflow. If you opt for the premium, upgraded package (which won’t run cheap), you’ll even get an exhaustive package of NewBlueFX fIlters to color your projects like a true Hollywood flick. What’s interesting about Vegas, and what we think gets overlooked, is they’ve attempted to give you an intuitive set of controls that takes the best of Final Cut, Premiere and others and merges them into one. Sure, it might not have the streamlined, Adobe CS-friendliness of Premiere, nor is it even compatible with Macs, but that’s OK. The workflow in this might just give certain users who can’t quite jive with the other guys a place to truly shine.
When it comes to video editing nobody wants to spend hours mastering nuances of video cutting techniques. All we usually need is to place several pieces together, add some fade-ins and outs, include subtitles and do this with as little efforts as possible. At the same time nobody wants to compromise with the final quality of the video. Indeed, simple not necessarily should mean primitive. VSDC Free Video Editor is a simple and easy to use video editor featuring a lot of functions even a pro editor wouldn't be ashamed of.
After all, if you say that it’s just video intros, I hope you understand that it’s the opening for everything, including your earning cash. Folks can only buy your product if they know it. And if you fail to make them watch your video promo, how can they know your product exists. So, at the end of Intro Video Creator Review, I hope you have better understanding about this amazing product and buy it before the price rises up.
The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.
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