Movie Maker Free Video Editor is a great tool if you want to put together some videos that will impress your friends. The tool comes with 8 video themes to choose form, each with customisable text. You can add in some pre-installed music clips to create mood, and even slap on some stickers. Make no mistake, Movie Maker Free Video Editor has everything you need to create a colourful video.

One of the cheaper options around ($49.99), Nero Video holds its own on this list—it comes well-stocked with a lot of the tricks and effects you’ll find among other products vying for video editing supremacy, and as far as software for beginners, you can certainly do worse. If you’re going to spend money learning how to edit videos, however, you might want to steer clear. Nero just doesn’t have the speed and functionality of some of the other products listed here, and if it’s value proposition is its price, $50 is still not all that cheap.  


As well as being free to download and use, Movie Maker Free Video Editor comes with an expansive library of features. As well as all of the standard cutting and trimming tools, the program allows you to apply effects, filters and transitions. You will be able to turn your clips into old-fashioned sepia, mirror them, change orientations, use fades and similar transitions, and apply whatever other elements you desire to help bring your videos to life. Each of these features is available to you with just a few clicks of your mouse.
Now one big question I know is on everyone's minds. APS-C or Full-Frame? Now the obvious answer is that if you're making money with the camera, go full-frame, if not, APS-C. But actually it's not that simple. First, there's no reason someone doing photography as a hobby shouldn't get a full-frame camera, other than the fact that they cost a whole lot more. But if you can afford it and you want the advantages of a full-frame camera (better resolutions, better low-light photography, etc.) and you don't mind the extra bulk, then why not? And on the flip-side, if you're a pro and want a smaller, less bulky camera to take with you on a shoot, then there's also no reason to say an APS-C camera will not be worth buying... But since you're looking at the T7i, let me go over a few actual advantages to an APS-C camera regardless of your status as an amateur or professional.
I love movie maker. I have zero background editing videos. I can use files from my phone or my camera and upload them. I can lay over a recorded audio or song recorded with the regular voice recorder on my phone. And can add transitions just as easy as a PowerPoint. Exports into several different file types, all labeled by program. For example- YouTube channel video, face book video, emailing, etc
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
×