There is one major hang-up with DVD authoring software: DVDs were invented before the advent of high-definition video. As such, they can only display standard-def footage. Since most videos are now shot in HD quality, your DVD authoring program has to compress the footage before it can burn it to a disc. This compression resulted in significant quality loss in each of the products we reviewed.
There is an awesome video creator called "VideoMakerFX". Althought, it may seem that it is a typical software of that type,but it has a lot distinquishable features,which will help you to create the best video. However, it costs quite a lot, but you can download it with a 40% discount using the following link: https://bit.ly/2Obzouh Thank you for spending time to read my comment - have a nice day! Eugene.
It´s a pleasure that Windows Movie Maker is really easy to use. What I mostly love about this free software is that it allows me to drag and drop pieces of videos that I have inside it, and then it lets me edit them and join them easily. I also love the upper menu that allows me to add text, music, and even effects (such as HQ video image and Black and White "textures"), by only clicking once on the desired option. I really think that editing videos is super easy when I use Windows Movie Maker.

When using this software, I was able to create videos that helped me teach and motivate students. I was also able to make videos that clarified concepts that we were working on in the classroom. I was able to teach students how to use the software which they did wonderfully. It brought joy to the classroom and the kids were doing something that they clearly enjoyed.
The Definition of Free: There's free and then there's freemium. Some software, like iMovie, is genuinely free. But just as some video-editing packages are sold in tiers — with more-expensive versions offering more and expanded features — a freemium video program may just be the lowest level of a paid version. Or it may be a trial version that hobbles the end product in various ways, like putting a huge watermark on your video or limiting output formats.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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