It gets to be somewhat annoying that after I use the software many times in a row, it becomes really slow. Let me give you an example: if I´ve edited around 10 videos in a row, then when I want to edit video 11, the software starts freezing, and when it finally starts working, it takes centuries for the video to be saved and downloaded successfully. I don´t know why this happens, but it would be great if Microsoft could check this issue.
It turns out that Windows Movie Maker is seriously lacking in the number of media formats available for saving your files – only four against dozens in the case of Movavi Video Editor Plus. Moreover, the Movavi app supports 4K video, which is definitely a huge advantage for those interested in handling videos in this resolution. The Intel® Media hardware acceleration is another neat feature that will make your working process a lot smoother if you go with Movavi.
Windows Movie Maker is a free video creator that is probably already installed on your computer since it is included in Windows Essential 2012, and if it is not, you can easily download it on www.windows.microsoft.com. This software is very easy to use, you only have to import photos or videos on your computer from any device, your flash drive, your camera or your phone. Your photos will appear in your Photo Gallery once you import them and later you can use them when you will make your movie in Movie Maker. You can also record a video from your webcam and add it to the Movie Maker. Movie Maker will let you create professional movie with transition, special effects and music.
One thing that I didn’t mention before was that the Rear LCD Screen is also a touch screen. Now this might seem like a big deal but it really does make using the camera a breeze. Rather than having to use the dial on the side here to change your settings, you can simply use your finger to quick change what you want. It’s very similar to using your phone and it’s also very responsive. Sure it might seem like a beginners feature, but I’ve found myself using it a lot to move quickly though the menus. Not only, now that the Canon T7i has it’s new dual pixel autofocus system, you can simply touch on the screen where you want it to focus and it will quickly and cinematically come into to focus. It’s great.
Like i said in my review of the Canon 77D however, I do wish the buttons were a little more pronounced because they are a little flat and hard to find when you’ve got your eye up to the viewfinder. At the top of the camera here you’ll notice that this is a little to the bigger brother the 77D. On the right the camera, we have your main mode dial. Essentailyl this where you can change the different setting that you want to shoot in whether that be automatic or the manual modes. One thing you’ll notice is that in the T7i you’re missing the mode dial lock that we saw on the 77d. This isn’t a huge deal to me but it’s one thing to be careful with so you don’t accidentally change your settings. At the top here we have a dedicated record button which is nice to see as well.
But you need to be prepared for situations as such as the SaaS vendor going out of business or their website going down. You need to have contingency procedures in place to combat these situations to make sure they do not have a harmful effect on your business. It is easy to subscribe to a SaaS solution, but think about the impact on your company if the platform is withdrawn by the provider.
You can only install Movie Maker as the Essentials bundle, a free set of lifestyle and utility apps for Windows 7 and Windows 8 that also includes Windows Photo Gallery. The single installer for all the Essentials apps offers an initial option of installing everything or letting you choose which to install. Since you may not need the Family Safety program, for example, I recommend the latter installation option. Movie Maker installs as a desktop application in Windows 8, and unfortunately, is not available for Windows RT tablets (though they do have alternatives like ArcSoft ShowBiz).
PowerDirector helps you enhance your footage with Intelligent Color Correction. This allows you to quickly and easily match color settings across your entire project, which unifies the look and feel of your video and eliminates a lot of guesswork. This might seem like a small thing, but it’s a huge leap forward for video editing software at the consumer level.
If you want something that is aimed more at the professional from a marketing standpoint, it couldn’t hurt to look into the Vegas Pro line. On its 15th iteration, Vegas has introduced a ton of new features, from hardware acceleration harnessing Intel QSV to a picture-in-picture OFX plug-in, all the way to a super intuitive new instant freeze frame option for referencing shots without stopping workflow. If you opt for the premium, upgraded package (which won’t run cheap), you’ll even get an exhaustive package of NewBlueFX fIlters to color your projects like a true Hollywood flick. What’s interesting about Vegas, and what we think gets overlooked, is they’ve attempted to give you an intuitive set of controls that takes the best of Final Cut, Premiere and others and merges them into one. Sure, it might not have the streamlined, Adobe CS-friendliness of Premiere, nor is it even compatible with Macs, but that’s OK. The workflow in this might just give certain users who can’t quite jive with the other guys a place to truly shine.

When asked if he had any advice for newbie editors learning the software, he recommended third-party resources. “Classes are great if they’re available and affordable,” Dutcher said. He also advised new video editors to “buy the manuals that are not published by the software companies, such as 'Final Cut Pro for Dummies,' because they’re written by actual users, and written in language that’s more accessible.”

We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.

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