Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs. /injects>
The Powershot GX 3 I purchased to backup my EOS 7D Mark II didn't work out because of the steep drop-off in IQ. I decided to give the EOS M6 a try after reading up on mirrorless cameras, and noting that the M6 sports an APS-C sensor. I took it for a shoot at a botanical garden the day after receiving it, and I'm generally pleased with the results. I shot mainly with the EF-M 18-150mm lens, and I made sparing use of the EF-M 11-22. Both lenses produced some decent shots, and they kept the overall size and weight of my gear down. I've humped the 7DMKII with a Sigma 50-150mm lens, and I'm inclined to forgive a small dropoff in IQ in return for a much smaller, lighter kit. The M6 may struggle to backup to the 7DMKII for action shots. The 7DMKII focuses more quickly and rattles off 10 frames in the blink of an eye. That said, the M6 did a creditable job of capturing a macro shot of a flower-hopping Bumble Bee (photo attached). It's going to take time to get used to using the tilt screen instead of a viewfinder for composing shots, but it became more comfortable the more I shot. Bright sunlight is a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. The tilt screen also helped in framing close to the ground shots without having to dig my knees in the dirt. Time will tell, but first impressions of the M6 are quite positive.

We have been reviewing video editing software since Top Ten Reviews launched in 2003. We have watched these programs grow from simple timeline editing to include tools that were only dreamed about for programs at the consumer level. Every year, our expert reviewers gather all the best software and use each program to create dozens of videos. The reviewers who evaluate video editing software all have a background in media production, particularly video. They have used the programs they review in a professional environment and in their personal lives. Their reviews and evaluations are informed not only by the hard data they collected but by years of personal experience using these types of applications. 


When asked if he had any advice for newbie editors learning the software, he recommended third-party resources. “Classes are great if they’re available and affordable,” Dutcher said. He also advised new video editors to “buy the manuals that are not published by the software companies, such as 'Final Cut Pro for Dummies,' because they’re written by actual users, and written in language that’s more accessible.”
In the midrange, there's Adobe Premiere Elements, which is cross-platform between Macs and PCs, and offers a lot more features and lots of help with creating effects. Professionals and prosumers have powerful, though pricey options in Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro. Final Cut is a deceptively simple application that resembles iMovie in its interface and ease of use, but it offers massively deep capabilities, and many third-party apps integrate with it for even more power. It also makes excellent use of the Touch Bar on the latest MacBook Pro, as shown in photo above. Premiere Pro uses a more traditional timeline and adds a large ecosystem of companion apps and plug-ins. It also excels in collaboration features.
A new standard for 4K video processing - simple, fast and quality-oriented. Edit, shrink, resize and encode 4K/5K/8K and HD/SD videos with minimal effort. macXvideo is engineered for peak performance in processing 4K videos. The unique GPU processing speeds up the workflow to where others can't, ending computer overheating or freezing. An exclusive compression engine is made to compress video like no one else, with minimum output size and every detail reserved. Within a few clicks, you can make amazing movies like a Pro.

The next advantage is something I already touched on earlier. The size and bulk. These prosumer line cameras are typically much smaller and lighter than their pro-grade cousins. However, I am now completely spoiled by USM lenses (specifically their new nano-USM system), and they are unfortunately bulkier than the "kit lenses" that typically come with these cameras. But overall even with the bulkier lenses, it'll still be much easier to move around with the T7i than with a 5D or a 1D...
The best video editing applications have tools that allow you to capture, edit and produce videos recorded by action cams like GoPros and Drift Innovation’s Ghost-S. These tools are generally as good as or better than the ones in the software that comes bundled with the cameras themselves. You can use them to stabilize shaky video, correct fish-eye distortion, enhance color, and pan and zoom around your footage. They can even slow down and reverse the video.

One of the cheaper options around ($49.99), Nero Video holds its own on this list—it comes well-stocked with a lot of the tricks and effects you’ll find among other products vying for video editing supremacy, and as far as software for beginners, you can certainly do worse. If you’re going to spend money learning how to edit videos, however, you might want to steer clear. Nero just doesn’t have the speed and functionality of some of the other products listed here, and if it’s value proposition is its price, $50 is still not all that cheap.  


Anyone would love super-easy task that can be accomplished in short span of time. Makewebvideo.com, a product from Mersica, is all about this. It offers its users to create online video in minimum duration of 30 minutes to 1 hour. Just select a template, customize your video and share with friends instantly. All videos here are produced with Adobe After Effects, the most loved and accessible software ever. It has other services like free trial video and video hosting.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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