Finally, you'll want to pay attention to sharing capabilities. In the past, you only needed to worry about saving your videos to a DVD or a highly compressed video file, but the rise of Vimeo and YouTube has resulted in new sharing options. If you're looking to share your videos to your social network, make sure that your software is capable of doing so.
But the supplied "MovieStar" capture/editing software's editing functions won't work and the program remains unstable. I keep getting errors like "Unable to build temporary movie for unknown reasons." Of course I read their FAQ and the manual (no section describing the problem.....no troubleshooting section). So far, I am unable to do anything with the clips but trim the ends to shorten them. To do this I have to "produce" a new clip for each editing function. I cannot combine clips by inserting transitions. And it still crashes the system....even with nothing else running. I suspect it is not compatible with my GeForce 256 video card. So I emailed their "support" address through their website [...] explaining the problem and got back a computerized response. Then I called their "support" number (long distance.....not an 800#) and was put on hold with the explanation that the California phone system was on the bugger implying that if I couldn't get hold of them it wasn't their fault. So, I left them a voice mail message with my office number. They called and left me a email where I was supposed to be able to get email support from them (anthonyp@dazzle.com) which was returned to sender.

Apple’s iMovie has long been one of the most consumer-orientated video editors out there. It’s bundled with all new Macs, and touts some serious practicality for the everyday user. The latest version of the software allows you to import and edit 4K video clips from a variety of external devices, such as smartphones and GoPro cameras, and sports a clean interface that is attractive and easy to navigate. The ability to start editing on iPhone or iPad and finish on a Mac renders it even more convenient.
Other video editing applications have dedicated tracks for video, audio, images, effects, etc. Object based editing makes the program more dynamic and easier to manage tracks. This program also employs proxy editing, in which the program creates lower-resolution copies of videos to use during the editing process. This cuts down on the time it takes to import, render and preview projects before you export them. When you’re done, it uses the original source files to export the final project.
VSDC Free Video Editor looks and feels just like a professional video editor. In fact, if feels almost identical to Final Cut Pro in a lot of ways. If you want to experience that style of in-depth video editing, this program is an epic way to do it for free. Be warned, though, that there's a steep learning curve unless you already have some experience.

Ok—so to those of you working with PCs, this one won’t really apply; but we’d remiss to leave it off the list. If you’re looking for simplicity and elegance, it doesn’t get much better than Apple iMovie. iMovie’s ten high-fidelity filters are some of the classiest in the video editing game; and if you’re shooting on your iPhone, or have been editing a project on your iPad, you can use AirDrop to wirelessly and seamlessly transfer your project over to your Mac.

The Dazzle Multimedia DM4100 Digital Video Creator is very useful to import video from your TV, VCR or DVD player into your PC for editing and then converting to PC video formats. The device is exceptionally good for making videos for use on the Web or as e-mail attachments. Thanks to its use of USB its very simple to install and can be "hot-swaped" with other USB device without rebooting your computer.
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