The Powershot GX 3 I purchased to backup my EOS 7D Mark II didn't work out because of the steep drop-off in IQ. I decided to give the EOS M6 a try after reading up on mirrorless cameras, and noting that the M6 sports an APS-C sensor. I took it for a shoot at a botanical garden the day after receiving it, and I'm generally pleased with the results. I shot mainly with the EF-M 18-150mm lens, and I made sparing use of the EF-M 11-22. Both lenses produced some decent shots, and they kept the overall size and weight of my gear down. I've humped the 7DMKII with a Sigma 50-150mm lens, and I'm inclined to forgive a small dropoff in IQ in return for a much smaller, lighter kit. The M6 may struggle to backup to the 7DMKII for action shots. The 7DMKII focuses more quickly and rattles off 10 frames in the blink of an eye. That said, the M6 did a creditable job of capturing a macro shot of a flower-hopping Bumble Bee (photo attached). It's going to take time to get used to using the tilt screen instead of a viewfinder for composing shots, but it became more comfortable the more I shot. Bright sunlight is a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. The tilt screen also helped in framing close to the ground shots without having to dig my knees in the dirt. Time will tell, but first impressions of the M6 are quite positive.
But the supplied "MovieStar" capture/editing software's editing functions won't work and the program remains unstable. I keep getting errors like "Unable to build temporary movie for unknown reasons." Of course I read their FAQ and the manual (no section describing the problem.....no troubleshooting section). So far, I am unable to do anything with the clips but trim the ends to shorten them. To do this I have to "produce" a new clip for each editing function. I cannot combine clips by inserting transitions. And it still crashes the system....even with nothing else running. I suspect it is not compatible with my GeForce 256 video card. So I emailed their "support" address through their website [...] explaining the problem and got back a computerized response. Then I called their "support" number (long distance.....not an 800#) and was put on hold with the explanation that the California phone system was on the bugger implying that if I couldn't get hold of them it wasn't their fault. So, I left them a voice mail message with my office number. They called and left me a email where I was supposed to be able to get email support from them (anthonyp@dazzle.com) which was returned to sender.
We’ve now got 1080p recording at 60 frames per second, which to be fair was a long time in the making. That means you can get some pretty nice slow motion in post. Sure theres not 4k video recording, but i wouldnt trade for the great dual pixel autofocus in video. Like i said before, it works fantastically. Especialyl for beginerrs who aren't used to manually focusing, essentially now they can just point the camera where they want it and it’ll be in focus. On the side here we have a dedicated microphone input which means you can add a shotgun mic on top, which is something id recommend as well.
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
If you had access to the video editing pro level, then you must try DaVinci Resolve 14. Except for multi-camera editing, 3D editing, motion blur effects, and spatial noise reduction which are only available on the paid version DaVinci Resolve Studio, you can almost do any professional video/audio editing and color correction with DaVinci Resolve 14.
Shooting and sharing videos has never been so easy, with a wide selection of mobile apps available to capture, edit and distribute your footage. Some are squeezed-down smartphone versions of powerful, desktop, video-editing software, while others are inventive new tools for the Instagram generation of social sharers. There are specialist video-making apps for special effects, stop-motion and even virtual reality film-making, and novelty apps to raise a smile with face swapping or retro filters. Here are 20 of the best apps to try in 2016, whatever your level of expertise.
I like that Windows Movie Maker makes my life easier and helps me earn a few extra dollars. And how? Well, as it´s super easy to use, I only have to drag and drop a video (with no audio) inside the panel of Movie Maker. After this, I just add a few special effects from the upper menu, and finally, I add audio (that contains subliminal affirmations) in an easy way by using again the drag-and-drop function that this software allows. Everything I´ve just said is what I like about Windows Movie Maker.
Those looking for a powerful editor with a huge variety of built-in resources and responsive technical support may be better off dropping some cash on a consumer video-editing program, like award winners Adobe Premiere Elements, CyberLink PowerDirector or Corel VideoStudio. However, first consider trying out software such as HitFilm Express 2017, VideoPad, DaVinci Resolve or VSDC, which offer all of the basics for free, and then purchasing additional features à la carte or simply upgrade as your experience and needs grow.

BTW, for whatever the reason, Canon still does not include a lens hood with the bundle. A bit odd that. So factor in about $35 for that (note that the hood from the older 18-135mm lens included with the 70D won’t work, you’ll need the EW-73D). Plus don’t forget you should really add a UV filter to protect your lens. I recommend a 67mm B+W (Hoya is good too) which won’t break the bank.
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
BIGVU is a mobile app-based video production tool that allows individual and small size video developers to shoot and post videos on various platforms. BIGVU offers three independent solutions - Social Video Creator, Video Presentation and Mobile Journalism. The suite can be used to create a variety of video contents such as marketing videos, sales pitches, news, social posts, training videos and online tutorials.
The T7i is a worthwhile upgrade from the T5i I previously purchased. Without getting into the expensive full-frame cameras, I received a 33% upgrade in megapixels, double the effective ISO, and slightly faster burst speed, from 5 to 6. The auto-focus is improved and buttons for quick access to display modes and ISO added. The built-in WiFi will allow quick transfer to mobile devices with the Canon app only. Bluetooth is only for camera control, and pictures cannot be transferred via bluetooth.
There are tons of in-program effects such as transitions, titles, credits, captions and even included audio scores, meaning you won’t get held up at any step of your editing process. There are panning and shift capabilities, high-quality post-processing zoom, as well as a plethora of color filtering plugins to give you the look you’ll need, even if the raw footage isn’t quite there. You’ll have the ability to export your movies in up to 4K resolution, and the software even supports 360-degree video projects. It’s a great powerhouse for beginners.
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