When it comes to user-friendliness, sophisticated features and ways to output your video, nothing beats the cross-platform Adobe Premiere Elements. With genuinely inspiring but practical features, Elements’ new video collage, audio remix, enhanced face detection, haze removal and adjustment layers focus on what consumers need every day. Its companion Organizer app keeps assets organized and searchable, and the touch-friendly interface works quite well in Windows 10.
Increasingly, new capabilities trickle down from professional-level software to the consumer category. That's a good thing for nonprofessional movie editors, since the more-consumer-oriented software makes formerly difficult procedures a cinch for them. Read on for a survey of the latest trends in video editing software and our top picks in the field.
I like how simple Windows Movie Maker is to use. It don't come with pre-installed with Windows 10, but I was able to quickly download and install it. The controls are pretty straightforward and remind me of the controls on other Windows software, like Microsoft Word and Excel. I like being able to add basic effects and transitions without needing to set a ton of parameters.
What Adobe Premiere Pro is to Windows PCs, Final Cut Pro X is to Mac users. It's the best video editing software for Mac. And, as you would suspect with Apple software, the must-have editor is consummately easy to use and comes packed with enough features to warrant the admittedly high price tag. We like the grouping tools, effect options and the simplistic way you can add and edit audio. If you're already entwined in Apple's ecosystem, you'll appreciate how Final Cut cleverly coordinates with your Photos or iTunes collections.
With an attractive interface, a multitude of video effects and the ability to upload directly to Facebook, Vimeo, Box and YouTube, Pinnacle Studio has long been a favorite in video editing. While it is one of the more expensive options in this list, and it doesn’t have 4K UHD support, Pinnacle serves as a nice middle-ground option for those who aren’t slackers in the video editing department, but who haven’t reached pro status just yet.
I purchased this product last weekend and love it so much, I'm buying a second copy later this week! I teach college and my summer project is to put all my lectures on Powerpoint. I hate learning new software and don't have the time for a drawn out learning curve. It took me minutes to set this up, and another hour or so to discover that this actually does almost everything I need (a phone call this afternoon to the tech help desk which kept me on hold for less than five minutes--a resonable wait in my opinion--explained that I couldn't do what I asked about. But I can do everything I need as far as audio goes, I can record decent video via VCR, and the television image I can monitor with software on my 'puter screen is actually clearer than on my television monitor (albeit much smaller). So I'm happy enough to try another copy (for work). I suppose in another year or so something better will come out, but for the casual video-editor who doesn't want to pour over tech specs, this is great!
This video editor gives you tons of control and editing power, but you'll have to know how to use it. The program could use a manual to help novice users comb through all of the features. Without that, VSDC Free Video Editor will take a lot of experimenting or previous editing know-how to figure out. It's worth spending plenty of time with, though.
True. The 80D “only” shoots up to 1080p HD. If you want 4K, look elsewhere — if you’re into landscapes or travel videography, this may matter to you. The world though is still mostly operating in 1080p. Keep in mind, 4K will multiply (significantly) your storage requirements, in addition to processing power needed to edit and render. Only you can decide if this is the time to make the jump (I still think mainstream 4K adoption is 2+ years away). I love my 4K computer monitors because fonts are razor sharp. Yet, I don’t see substantive different between 80D images and those, say, from a Panasonic G7. The latter looks somewhat digital to my eyes, though it’s still a fine little camera.
I have been using this software for quite a long time and the thing I like the most is how simple it is to use. The coolest thing is that I can get titles, subtitles and even give credits to my video work with just one click, YES! ONE CLICK! One more thing is that making your videos more exciting is as easy as adding songs to any of the frames you have so that you can give different types of moods to different parts of your video. This software is very complete.
I sincerely believe that if you purchase any of these products that they will NOT work with a PS3 game system. I get the same thing that others get ... "no input signal" ... from the Pinnacle Studio 14 software included with the Dazzle. However I have the same software game for the PC, and despite TWO different capture attempts with other 3rd party software (which have no trouble capturing screen activities otherwise), the UbiSoft game could not be captured at all. Therefore, if you're using a PS3 and you want to capture your gameplay as video you'd better look elsewhere! I KNOW it can be done because the same game(s) ARE captured by others and you can see the videos on YouTube, so there must be a way. I just haven't found it here with the 'Dazzle'. Frankly, I'm not really dazzled by this hardware. Of interesting note there are two other video capture devices sold by Avid/Pinnacle, however they seem to contradict themselves with their Specifications Pages and Feature Pages. In one the Features says you can capture video from '... game systems and others...' however on the same device's Specifications page nowhere does it stipulate which gaming systems you can capture video from! In the other device it's just the reverse (i.e. Spec page says "... game systems...", and the Features page says nothing about gaming systems). Perhaps it's the PS3, or the Software Programs' video is encoded prohibiting captures? Who knows, perhaps this is a good product for video captures from other sources, but this just doesn't work for my PS3!
Its 360-degree footage tools allow you to set anchor points, pan and zoom through your footage, add effects, and stabilize shaky recordings. The program even has dedicated 360-degree titles that match your footage perfectly, rather than trying to warp a regular title to fit. And with the view designer, you can convert 360-degree videos to work with conventional projects.
What I like best abut Windows Movie Maker is that it is so simple to use! It's been the standard movie editing program for me for a while now, for basic movie editing needs. There is no need for countless controls and buttons. The interface is so simple and easy to use. Easily import footage such as photos and videos, and easily edit/cut and combine them all together. Even very easy to add pre-made transitions without having to manually animate them.
Windows Movie Maker is free video editing software available on virtually every PC. Developed by Microsoft as part of the standard program suite, it was included in Windows XP and, more recently, Windows 7 and Windows 8. Even though it is not supported for Windows 10, you can still download Windows Movie Maker and install it on this newest operating system, as well. But should you really do that? You can try a powerful alternative like Movavi Video Editor Plus that gives you access to a wider range of tools and is also available to Mac users.
The Dazzle Multimedia DM4100 Digital Video Creator is very useful to import video from your TV, VCR or DVD player into your PC for editing and then converting to PC video formats. The device is exceptionally good for making videos for use on the Web or as e-mail attachments. Thanks to its use of USB its very simple to install and can be "hot-swaped" with other USB device without rebooting your computer. 
×