The ISO is also quite high for a prosumer grade camera, at 25,600. Obviously even with the best cameras using very high ISO's will result in more noise in your photos, but when it's capable of such high maximum ISO's, that means you can push the ISO numbers higher with less noise. For an example, with my T3i, once I hit ISO800, the image is already getting quite noisy. On the other hand, with the T7i, I've shot photos at ISO6400 (8x that for you not so handy at math, lol) before I start to notice some noise. So low-light photography is actually quite nice with the T7i, as are low-light movies.
One of the capabilities that has been making its way into consumer-level video editing software is support for LUTs (lookup tables), also known as CLUTs (color lookup tables). This staple of pro-level software lets you quickly change the look of a video to give it a specific mood. For example, think of the dark blue look of thriller movies like The Revenant. You can download LUTs for free from several sites or use those included with some video software to give your video a specific look. One well-known LUT type is the kind that can make a daytime scene look like it was shot at night.

Of course, none of the extras matter if an app can't do the most basic editing tasks. At this point, however, all of the products included here do a good job of letting you join, trim, and split video clips. They also let you make use of special effects such as animated transitions, picture-in-picture (PiP), chroma-key (the technique that lets you place a subject against any background, often known as green screening), and filters that enhance colors or apply creative effects and distortions. With most of them you can add a multitude of timeline tracks that can accommodate video clips, effects, audio, and text overlays.
I´m sorry to say that there are a couple things I don´t like that much: the first thing is that some short videos (less than a couple mega bytes) can delay the software, and it´ll take you a long time to finish uploading them to Windows Movie Maker. For example, sometimes, I upload a short video to edit, and it´s ready in a few seconds. But then, I upload another shorter video to edit, but this takes years to be ready. The last thing I don´t like is that the software stops working out of the blue some times.
In the production industry, when most people think about editing software, their minds don't go to Windows Movie Maker on a PC. I'm not an expert on how to achieve that, but I gather a revamped look (which seems more like a professional editing suite) that retains the intuitive, user-friendly feel would be a start. The issue may not be with Movie Maker, but more so a computer's ability to handle the rich files (raw video) and storage required to edit.

With Movavi Video Editor, it’s fun and easy to create wonderful videos even for beginners. Simply drop your media files onto the timeline and use the Windows-friendly editing tools to customize. Like most video editors, the Movavi Video Editor allows you to make basic changes to your clips by trimming, cutting and rotating them to any angle. With this software, however, you can also become your own movie producer by using multiple filters, transitions, titles, stickers and special effects. Show multiple videos on one screen with the picture-in-picture tool or freeze the video at any frame for added emphasis. Make video cards to send to family and friends or preserve vacation memories in a format people will actually want to watch. Automatically improve video quality with Magic Enhance, or manually adjust color parameters like brightness, contrast and saturation for better viewability. Movavi Video Editor even helps you minimize annoying motion distortion with the stabilization tool. 
Personal suggestion, If you are looking for budget camera(Crop Sensor), get some good camera body based on your regular usage(photo or video) then invest on good lens. Don't go for trash bundle package with camera, quality will not be good. I tried T6 2 weeks back and I returned immediately then chose t7 body alone. Spend more time on research before ordering .
Another feature that's new to me coming from a T3i that I love is the grid that you can have showing in the view-finder. Before you had to buy a replacement viewfinder eye-piece to get a grid and they didn't offer one for the T3i. Now it's done digitally and it's awesome. My only gripe is that you can't actually customize what grid pattern you want. But it's definitely a step in the right direction.
Shooting movies is also great now with the servo AF feature. My T3i required that I manually focused while shooting movies. With the servo AF, the camera will actually follow the moving subject adjusting the focus on the fly. I mean, your cell phone can do it and so could my point-and-shoot Canon camera, but their old DSLRs actually didn't have that feature, but now (well, since like the T5i I think) they do and it's very useful. Speaking of movie mode, I very much like that they added another step in the power switch for movie mode instead of requiring you to turn the knob all the way to the very end to get to movie mode. Now you simply flip the switch to it.

I've had big trouble finding free video editor for windows until I've found this. After using it for ½ year for youtubing and gamining videos I bought it for ca. 20$. That unlocked few futures like faster rendering and adaptive alfa background remover. They are constantly developing so once in a while there are new options. Last update was 64bit hardware enhancement for faster rendering and editing, previews update gave us 4K videos. Thanks VSDC
Apple’s Final Cut Pro X software falls into what we call the “prosumer” category because it treads the line between a product for consumers who want to up their video-editing game and one for professionals who need powerful editing tools. It lacks a traditional timeline-track interface, which is enough to scare some users off, but the software is intuitive and powerful nonetheless. It has great organizational tools like libraries, ratings, tagging, auto analysis for faces and scenes, and automatic color coding for track-specific clips, useful keyboard short-cuts and drag-and-drop media importing give Adobe’s Premiere Elements a run for its money. Unfortunately, you can't directly open projects from Final Cut Pro 7 or earlier, but there are many third-party plug-ins that will help you out there.​
I have been using this software for quite a long time and the thing I like the most is how simple it is to use. The coolest thing is that I can get titles, subtitles and even give credits to my video work with just one click, YES! ONE CLICK! One more thing is that making your videos more exciting is as easy as adding songs to any of the frames you have so that you can give different types of moods to different parts of your video. This software is very complete.
Wondershare Filmora supports a wide range of video formats, including .MP4, .AVI, .MOV, .AVCHD and many more. It also enables you to crop, trim, cut, split and even combine footage with a few easy clicks of the mouse. What's more, it also provides various filters and visual effects to help you touch up your video. Currently, there are more than 300 builtin effects available, and you can find more effects on Filmora Effects Store.
VideoPad is a comprehensive cross-platform software package for the YouTube social media crowd. While this app lacks the flashy, whiz-bang appeal of some commercial apps, it’s still a rock-solid choice for simple video editing. From the main menu, you can choose which social network you want to upload to. The app offers a number of YouTube choices ranging from 480p to 4K, as well as Facebook, Flickr, Dropbox and Google Drive, and is free for non-commercial use.

VideoPad is a comprehensive cross-platform software package for the YouTube social media crowd. While this app lacks the flashy, whiz-bang appeal of some commercial apps, it’s still a rock-solid choice for simple video editing. From the main menu, you can choose which social network you want to upload to. The app offers a number of YouTube choices ranging from 480p to 4K, as well as Facebook, Flickr, Dropbox and Google Drive, and is free for non-commercial use.
Aside from video, images and audio can also be incorporated into your project by simply dragging your desired multimedia into the project area and arranging them in timeline-like fashion. The resulting video can always be previewed in real time, as well as any effects — themes, text, music, voice-overs  — before exporting the file directly to YouTube, Facebook, or a wealth of other platforms.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.

This open-source software program runs smoothly with Windows 10. It has a very user-friendly interface makes navigating the program easy for those with a little experience in video editing. Your files can even be extended using third-party video filters and it supports batch processing which means it is possible to handle multiple videos at the same time. Unfortunately, even with its friendly interface, this program can be a little difficult to understand for beginners.

Particularly intensive is the process of rendering your finished product into a standard video file that will by playable on the target device of choice, be that an HDTV, a laptop, or a smartphone. Most of the software can take advantage of your computer's graphics processor to speed this up. Be sure to check the performance section in each review linked here to see how speedy or slow the application is. In rendering speed testing, CyberLink and Pinnacle have been my perennial champs.
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