There are two different licenses you can choose from with Lightworks: "Free" and "Pro." (The latter of which, as you might have guessed, requires that you cough up some cash.) The main difference between the two licenses is that the Pro version offers more features, including stereoscopic output and advanced project sharing. But the free version is still quite powerful, providing 100+ effects and supporting multicam editing.
Camera works great. Takes amazing video and photos. You have to be very careful with that screen on the back though. I already shattered it by knocking over my tripod and it landed against a padded backpack hanging against my closet door. I have no idea how it shattered?? But lesson learned, be very careful with this one. I have since bought a neoprene case to put on it when not in use. I love the camera still. It is a great size and light weight, but a very solid and durable body. This combo is a great deal as well, saving you around $65-70. Would definitely recommend this camera to anyone.
Another thing I don't like is how they decided to "encode" their batteries. I'm sure there's some advantage to it, most likely safety to ensure you're using a genuine Canon battery they can quality control, but how it's affected me is that now buying an aftermarket battery means that you won't get a read-out of how much power you have left while using them. Not a huge deal, but it is kind of annoying. I like to have spare batteries, but at almost $60 a pop, no way I can afford to have a genuine Canon one. So I'll have to live with one made by a 3rd party and not knowing how much power is left in it if I have to use it... It also means the Canon charger will refuse to charge these batteries, so the 3rd party charger will be required to charge up these 3rd party batteries...

Lumen5 markets itself as a tool that turns blog posts into social promos. While the process isn’t perfect, and you’ll likely have to do some tinkering to get your blog content looking just the way you want it, the rest of the video creation process is a cinch. Merely refine some copy that teases your blog post; drag and drop some gifs, screengrabs, or video clips; add some music; and your engaging social video will be ripe for Facebook and Twitter.


Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
CyberLink PowerDirector: A capable and fast video editing software application for Windows. This consumer-level platform supports 360-degree VR footage. Main features include multicam editing, look-up table support, color match, and express project templates. In short, video makers can easily utilize this tool to produce professional-quality videos.
Early one morning in December 2013, I wandered into where my computer desktop was located. My wife asked “What do you think about this deal?” “You’re buying me a Canon 5D Mk III?” She answered “Yes”. I said “Go for it! But let me check B&H”. The 5D package on Amazon was $4000. I found a similar package with the same EF 24-105 f4L lens on B&H for $3500. I didn’t need the cheapy tripod that was in the Amazon deal since I bought a Manfrotto in 2012.
You may want to expand into specialty and high-end features like stop-motion video, multi-camera editing, 3D 360 VR, and support for the official Ultra HD 4K format used by most Blu-ray players. You’ll generally find that the most expensive consumer video editors support these features well, and the cheaper ones either don’t support them or produce lackluster results.
You might also be looking at the older T6i. I reviewed this camera a lot last year and it was a great beginners dslr. It doesn't that dual pixel autofocus, instead it has a hybrid autofocus. Personally id recommend getting the t7i instead. On the upper end you could look at the Canon 70D or 80D. I actually use a Canon 70d and love it, and the 80d is a step up again. For beginners to intermediates, the t7i will be more than capable, but if you really want a great camera, go for the 80d.
Windows Movie Maker is a free video creator that is probably already installed on your computer since it is included in Windows Essential 2012, and if it is not, you can easily download it on www.windows.microsoft.com. This software is very easy to use, you only have to import photos or videos on your computer from any device, your flash drive, your camera or your phone. Your photos will appear in your Photo Gallery once you import them and later you can use them when you will make your movie in Movie Maker. You can also record a video from your webcam and add it to the Movie Maker. Movie Maker will let you create professional movie with transition, special effects and music.
The Edit menu also contains the new Stabilization choice if you're running Windows 8 or 8.1, as well as play speedup and slow-mo (this retains the audio, so you can have fun making you and your friends sound like chipmunks or lions). As in iMovie, all editing is done in the same thumbnail/timeline area—no popup windows for trimming like you find in other video editors like CyberLink PowerDirector.
One of the things I really like about working in Movie Maker is that most of the effects, transitions, and themes preview automatically when you just hover the mouse cursor over their buttons. Another plus is the undo and redo buttons are right up top—video editing is a very trial-and-error process—but I suppose it's too much to ask for a history window in such a simple application.

We created, exported and reviewed all of the results. We watched every video we made, looking for imperfections in the video and audio. Flaws such as pixelation, compression artifact, motion blur and more were present in most of the videos we examined, but they varied greatly depending on which program we used. Each program was given an A to F quality grade based on this evaluation.
The software that it came with is amazing, and works even better if you can use it correctly with Windows Movie Maker (save file as Windows Movie Maker, then import that file on Movie Maker, add effects, save, and import back to the Pinnacle software if you like). Or, if you don't want to use the Pinnacle software, that's fine too... just find on your computer where the file is saved at, and import that to whatever software you use. (As for Mac users, I suppose you could use garage band... I don't own a Mac so it would be difficult for me to say)
Video editing has become more and more popular due to the popularity of camcorders and convenience of online video sharing. To save money, you can use some free video editing tools. But it would be a little bit difficult to find a good free video creator as there are too many free video editing programs available on the market. If you are looking for the best choice among them and want your memories in motion, you should check the following top 6 best free video creator.
I still use an older Sony cassette based Camcorder as a hand held unit when storm chasing and with this and the included software its very easy to pull the videos directly off of the camera and save in the Chase folder for editing. I do have several newer digital camcorders but I love the feel of the older heavier units and this makes getting those videos off the camera and into production a breeze. Excellent Product !!!

We also spoke with Richard Dutcher, an independent filmmaker and director of eight feature films including “Brigham City,” “Falling," "God's Army” and “Evil Angel.” He told us that the time you spend learning a new program is at a premium. “I like things that are intuitive and with the fastest learning curve. The less time spent becoming familiar and proficient the better. The sooner I can get to work and putting the film together - that’s the most important thing to me.”
Very simple, easy-to-use video creation software that is highly accessible to PC users. Interface is consistent with other Microsoft products (ribbon interface) which ensures some familiarity for those with experience with any of Microsoft's other products (especially recent versions of Office). It has all the basic video editing tools available, as well as a good selection of transition and visual effects.
Next getting the software to work was another challange. despite having a fast machine with a lot of RAM, I found the Movie Star program to be very unstable. I was able to capture up to 60 minutes of video and save it to the MPEG format, but everytime I tried to edit or export the video as Windows Media or Real, it crashed the machine. I downloaded a copy of Ulead's Video Studio, but couldn't figure out how to import MPEG files. I finally bit the bullet and wound up downloading a free 30-day trial of Adobe Premier. I found Premier to be a very stable and easy to use program. I just wish it didn't cost [so much!]
Hello, I'm just getting into the world of animating and I'm looking for a free video software like this. I'm seeing multiple comments saying it's not free? I'm using Windows Movie Maker and here me out, it's easy to use, but I'm looking for one that I can add effects to my videos. Windows Movie Maker doesn't let me add effects :( I'm trying to find a non-virus free compatible video editor so I can add some effects and make it look good. Any suggestions? I'm not looking to spend any money on things yet since I'm still a beginner
Many independent vendors, who are often sole proprietors in charge of the software, make themselves available to users via social media and email to assist with problems, troubleshoot, take suggestions and criticism, and otherwise oversee the software. Programs with intuitive interfaces and tool-tip hints, and even built-in tutorials to greet new users, make free software popular.
Taking a vacation this summer to the shore, overseas, a theme park, or somewhere exotic, like Cleveland? There's a good chance you're going to want to film some of your trip. But instead of letting it languish on your smartphone, DSLR or compact camera, you'll want to polish it up to share with family and friends. That's where a good video editing program comes in.
Those that have followed my video posts here on Stark Insider over the years know that I’m a die-hard 70D fan. I’ve used it to shoot interviews, live music concerts, backstage Broadway segments, and various food and travel episodes. I especially like the flip-out LCD (handy for framing shots when holding the camera high or very low), the sweet Dual Pixel auto-focus with subject tracking, and quiet performance of Canon’s STM lenses.
4k and gif support are boilerplate features for most video editing products today, but one thing Filmora does particularly well is titles. Title tools are trending in video software, and while Filmora’s doesn’t have the functionality of say, an Apple Final Cut Pro X, which can superimpose 3D titles over your videos and rotate them on three axes, it nonetheless has some snazzy titling features for the money you’re spending.
These aren't just your quick videos that give a few tips. These videos are based on the weekly Video Creators podcast and take time to go more in-depth and explore the details of growing a YouTube channel and an audience. Sometimes they're live streams, other times they're long-form interviews. Either way, you'll enjoy digging deeper into audience growth topics in this playlist.
Early one morning in December 2013, I wandered into where my computer desktop was located. My wife asked “What do you think about this deal?” “You’re buying me a Canon 5D Mk III?” She answered “Yes”. I said “Go for it! But let me check B&H”. The 5D package on Amazon was $4000. I found a similar package with the same EF 24-105 f4L lens on B&H for $3500. I didn’t need the cheapy tripod that was in the Amazon deal since I bought a Manfrotto in 2012.
Like iMovie, Movie Maker uses a simplified version of the standard video editor timeline, with clips represented by "long thumbnails." The first frame is shown at full contrast, while the following ones are faded, in a distinction between this look and iMovie's. The thumbnail tracks optionally show you the audio waveforms along the bottom, so you can see where the loud and quiet parts of your video lay. You get five size choices for the thumbs, which is probably enough, and a zoom control at the bottom lets you stretch out these clip representations. You can trim or split clips using the cursor insertion point combined with edit buttons. It's quite easy once you get used to the unique editing system used by the app: you click at a point in your clip, and can then drag the resulting insertion line around the timeline.
Corel VideoStudio has all the characteristics of the other top-of-the-line products on this list, including 360-degree VR and 4k support, but it also has the distinction of being the first piece of consumer video editing software to offer motion tracking—which, if you’re not already familiar, is a feature that allows you to track specific objects throughout your cut (if you wanted, say, to point an arrow at one of your characters, blur out his face, or bestow him with a funny hat). Most of the products on this list come equipped with motion tracking, but VideoStudio still boasts one of the best motion tracking systems around.

If you have the budget, the 70D would be my pick of the litter. Keep in mind, if you own an iPhone and are simply publishing basic vlogs to YouTube, you might not need anything more. If you’re aiming to achieve “filmic” results, and want to interchange lenses (so you can capture close-ups and wide angles for instance) then definitely give these DSLR cameras consideration.


It gets to be somewhat annoying that after I use the software many times in a row, it becomes really slow. Let me give you an example: if I´ve edited around 10 videos in a row, then when I want to edit video 11, the software starts freezing, and when it finally starts working, it takes centuries for the video to be saved and downloaded successfully. I don´t know why this happens, but it would be great if Microsoft could check this issue.
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