What I like best abut Windows Movie Maker is that it is so simple to use! It's been the standard movie editing program for me for a while now, for basic movie editing needs. There is no need for countless controls and buttons. The interface is so simple and easy to use. Easily import footage such as photos and videos, and easily edit/cut and combine them all together. Even very easy to add pre-made transitions without having to manually animate them.

The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.

Finally, we used each program to compress a 4K video file into a smaller resolution. We then examined the results looking for imperfections in the picture such as compression artifacts, motion blur, distortion, ghosting and more. PowerDirector’s results were simply outstanding. We could find almost no indication that the video had been compressed, even when viewed on an ultra-high-definition monitor.
Windows' included video editing software is all about simplicity: There's really no simpler way to combine your clips into digital movies with titles, transitions, background music, and effects. In earlier releases, the program was so simple that it wasn't capable of doing things people commonly needed, but little by little, stuff like voiceover recording and even anti-shake have made their way into what is now a very useful free app for digital video editing. Let's be clear, Movie Maker still lacks a lot of effects and tools you get in Apple's entry-level video editor, iMovie, not to mention enthusiast-level products like Adobe Premiere Elements or CyberLink PowerDirector, but for basic needs and ease of use, it hits the mark.
I'll keep this short ... despite a bad review on Amazon, I bought this product. I received it promptly, I installed the highly regarded Pinnacle Studio v14 software FIRST, on my computer, AS INSTRUCTED. I connected the Canon DV tape camcorder to the Dazzle with the 'AV Out' cable that came with the camcorder originally, plugged the Dazzle into a front-mounted USB port on the computer, launched Studio, and imported 6 year old video from tape to disk by simply hitting the 'play' button on the camcorder ... I have a lot more work to do for video editing, but this beats the HELL out of installing a machine specific capture card. I can't think of a simpler way to capture tape-based video. You can pick from a variety of file outputs, I used AVI and I'll probably experiment more and use whatever burns to DVD the best for HD tv viewing. I was dreading the pain of capturing old video, but this has made it much easier than I expected, at a very reasonable cost considering the hardware/software package you get. In fact, it works well enough that I'm willing to stick with my DV tape camera for a while longer. More importantly I have old but good quality video of family, dogs and fun that I can now capture and save to DVD.

Tech support and documentation: One of the big distinctions between paid and free software is the level of documentation and tech support; paid software has more-explicit and -detailed documentation and guides than the free versions. That said, many software packages post instructional videos of the most popular features to YouTube, and more-complex free packages may offer extensive documentation.

Apple’s Final Cut Pro X software falls into what we call the “prosumer” category because it treads the line between a product for consumers who want to up their video-editing game and one for professionals who need powerful editing tools. It lacks a traditional timeline-track interface, which is enough to scare some users off, but the software is intuitive and powerful nonetheless. It has great organizational tools like libraries, ratings, tagging, auto analysis for faces and scenes, and automatic color coding for track-specific clips, useful keyboard short-cuts and drag-and-drop media importing give Adobe’s Premiere Elements a run for its money. Unfortunately, you can't directly open projects from Final Cut Pro 7 or earlier, but there are many third-party plug-ins that will help you out there.​
Those that have followed my video posts here on Stark Insider over the years know that I’m a die-hard 70D fan. I’ve used it to shoot interviews, live music concerts, backstage Broadway segments, and various food and travel episodes. I especially like the flip-out LCD (handy for framing shots when holding the camera high or very low), the sweet Dual Pixel auto-focus with subject tracking, and quiet performance of Canon’s STM lenses.
Adding and arranging: When you're ready to make a movie, your first step will be to choose what type of files to add. Options include Video, Audio, Image, Icon, and Lyric. You can add any and all of these to the same project and then move them around on the Timeline until you have them where you want them. And if you're new to this type of program, there's a convenient Movie Wizard to guide you through the process.
Slightly different from the league is Dvolver.com which is a set up providing moviemaking services. Dvolver organizes online film festival ‘Dfilm’ that gives opportunity to the users to make their own digital films. Dfilm has cartoon based software as well which is fun to use. It allows friends and family to chat and talk through cell phones via SMS, MMS, instant messaging and others.
Once you’ve cut your teeth with the basic video editing tools, you can move on to using the more powerful ones. The best editing software is compatible with all the latest video and audio technology on the market today. For example, they can import, edit and export at ultra-high-definition 4K resolution. This makes your videos crisp, clear and enjoyable on today’s large ultra-HD televisions.
Premiere Clip is perfect for creatives whose videos are bound for social media channels like YouTube and Instagram. You can easily import video clips from places like your phone, Lightroom, Creative Cloud and Dropbox, and then use the app’s Freeform editor to trim or split clips, adjust exposure and highlights, add audio and more. And, of course, you can add filters, which is a given in today’s social media sphere.
Because it's so deeply entwined with the macOS, iMovie was one of the fastest apps when it came to encoding video. Once that's finished, it also gives you plenty of sharing options: You can upload directly to YouTube, Facebook and Vimeo, and share any video frame as an image. When you couple iMovie with iMovie Theater and iCloud, you can also view your creations on any Apple device or via Apple TV.
I still use an older Sony cassette based Camcorder as a hand held unit when storm chasing and with this and the included software its very easy to pull the videos directly off of the camera and save in the Chase folder for editing. I do have several newer digital camcorders but I love the feel of the older heavier units and this makes getting those videos off the camera and into production a breeze. Excellent Product !!!
Camera works great. Takes amazing video and photos. You have to be very careful with that screen on the back though. I already shattered it by knocking over my tripod and it landed against a padded backpack hanging against my closet door. I have no idea how it shattered?? But lesson learned, be very careful with this one. I have since bought a neoprene case to put on it when not in use. I love the camera still. It is a great size and light weight, but a very solid and durable body. This combo is a great deal as well, saving you around $65-70. Would definitely recommend this camera to anyone.
However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.
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