I´m sorry to say that there are a couple things I don´t like that much: the first thing is that some short videos (less than a couple mega bytes) can delay the software, and it´ll take you a long time to finish uploading them to Windows Movie Maker. For example, sometimes, I upload a short video to edit, and it´s ready in a few seconds. But then, I upload another shorter video to edit, but this takes years to be ready. The last thing I don´t like is that the software stops working out of the blue some times.

iMovie is a free video creator for mac equivalent to the Windows Movie Maker. This software is included free on every new Mac and if you don`t have it you can download it on www.apple.com. This software is very easy to use, now you can organize all your clips and later turn them into a movie. When you import your clips iMovie will organize them by Events. You can add music background and add titles. There are also some templates you can use like Romantic Comedy, Epic Drama and Adventure. You can also choose from 19 audio effects and you can add jump or flip effects to match your music. The good side of this software is that it comes in many languages and it has simple interface, but on the bad side, it will take your time until you learn how to use it.

CyberLink PowerDirector: A capable and fast video editing software application for Windows. This consumer-level platform supports 360-degree VR footage. Main features include multicam editing, look-up table support, color match, and express project templates. In short, video makers can easily utilize this tool to produce professional-quality videos.
Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.
So—we stretched the meaning of “software” a bit earlier; now, we’re going to stretch the meaning of “beginner.” We included CyberLink PowerDirector on this list because its interface is, at the end of the day, pretty straightforward. Head to the product page, run through the tutorials, and you’ll be alright. There is within the interface, however, an embarrassment of options and effects. If you’re not willing to invest the time in learning all of them, it can get a bit overwhelming. 

Premiere Clip is perfect for creatives whose videos are bound for social media channels like YouTube and Instagram. You can easily import video clips from places like your phone, Lightroom, Creative Cloud and Dropbox, and then use the app’s Freeform editor to trim or split clips, adjust exposure and highlights, add audio and more. And, of course, you can add filters, which is a given in today’s social media sphere.
I got this last week and have been transferring 10 to 20+ year old VHS and VHS-c movies to the computer. That is probably all I will ever use it for but it is doing a good job for me. Installed easily (Win 7 64 bit) and the editing software is good enough. I am just doing basic stuff. Splitting the video up by date and/or size (to keep it less than 2GB per file).
With a full support for dozens of video codecs and formats including but not limiting to AVI, MP4, MKV, MPG, WMV, 3GP, FLV for video; MP3, WAV, WMA, FLAC, PCM, OGG, AAC, M4A, AMR for audio; and BMP, JPG, PNG, PSD, ICO, TIFF for images, VSDC Free Video Editor provides one of the easiest ways to combine multiple source chunks in different formats into a resulting high-quality video. A bunch of filters can turn even a commonplace video sequence into a classy pro-quality movie, while thousands of video and audio effects conveniently grouped into four categories help you making your video to look and sound more dynamic. Not only does VSDC Free Video Editor offer powerful video editing capabilities, it is also surprisingly easy to use. Forget video conversion back and forth between different formats. Import from any devices and cams, including GoPro and drones, is available. Currently it is the only free video editor that allows users to export in a new H.265/HEVC codec, something essential for those working with 4K and HD. New versions have also enabled an easy export to social networks: special profiles for YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. All multimedia processing done from one app: video editing capabilities reinforced by a video converter, a screen capture, a video capture, a disc burner and a YouTube uploader.
Since people now watch, store and share videos on tablets and smartphones, it's important for video editing programs to be able to export to these devices. Nearly all the products we reviewed can do so to some degree, but the best ones have companion mobile apps you can sync with their desktop counterparts, which makes transferring faster and more secure.
We evaluated each program’s interface and workflow to see how intuitive they are. We tracked the number of clicks it takes to access and use common tools. If a tool is difficult to find, awkwardly implemented or counterintuitive, it can slow down your edits. We quickly discovered that the more accessible everything is, the better the editing experience will be. We gave each program an A to F grade based on this evaluation. 
All the other tools you would expect from consumer-level video editing software are present and work excellently. You can add titles, closed captions and other text to your video project with a few simple clicks. You also get a video stabilizer that smooths out shaky video, as well as a library of over 500 effects and transitions for you to choose from.

Increasingly, new capabilities trickle down from professional-level software to the consumer category. That's a good thing for nonprofessional movie editors, since the more-consumer-oriented software makes formerly difficult procedures a cinch for them. Read on for a survey of the latest trends in video editing software and our top picks in the field.

As the industry leader in video editing, Adobe Premiere Pro CC comes with a redesigned timeline and Paste Effects, which allows you to copy and paste the effects you need from one clip to another, making your editing faster and more efficient. Other new features include new sync settings, the ability to browse through your projects to find and combine clips faster, closed captioning features and improved multicam editing. And as part of the Creative Cloud, it’s backed by the Adobe Creative Suite, integrated with Behance and can be synced across multiple workstations.
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First, I already kind of mentioned, but the grid view inside the viewfinder, they should give you options and the "thirds" grid should definitely be an option as the "rule of thirds" is a very good guide to follow in the absence of a clearer way to frame a photo. I hope in their future cameras they will have this. Or if somehow a firmware upgrade could add this, I'm not sure how hard-wired this grid is in the viewfinder if moving the lines would even be possible through software...
The ISO is also quite high for a prosumer grade camera, at 25,600. Obviously even with the best cameras using very high ISO's will result in more noise in your photos, but when it's capable of such high maximum ISO's, that means you can push the ISO numbers higher with less noise. For an example, with my T3i, once I hit ISO800, the image is already getting quite noisy. On the other hand, with the T7i, I've shot photos at ISO6400 (8x that for you not so handy at math, lol) before I start to notice some noise. So low-light photography is actually quite nice with the T7i, as are low-light movies.
When a customer asks me if I can finish editing any of the videos they´ll use for parties, proms, speeches, etc., I agree because I know I can get the job done with Movie Maker. Windows Movie Maker gives me the ability to give more life to videos by adding musical pieces; it also gives me the ability to make them more sophisticated by adding the director´s name and credits. These are some of the business benefits I get from Movie Maker: I make my clients happy.

So you might be a little intimidated by the idea of a DSLR with the different lenses and the switches and the buttons and you were probably hearing me and others rant about the ISO, APS-C, aperture, etc. and wondered what the heck that is and why they are good or bad... Well, completely understandable. And while I recommend reading some good books on the topic (Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson is an excellent one BTW), this phone has a new feature that is sure to make the transition a lot easier and less intimidating. Now the default LCD information view shows like a feature guide. Basically when you select a mode on the knob, the LCD will actually display an easy to understand summary of what that mode is called and basically what it means for your photo. Sometimes with some basic graphics to represent the differences. I turned this off and is using the old-style view, not because I'm a snob, but because I have used DSLRs before and have a little technical experience with it to know what they mean. The guided view is just too bright and I like the dark theme of the standard information view. But this new way of showing the different modes is actually quite awesome if you're just starting out with DSLR photography.


So—we stretched the meaning of “software” a bit earlier; now, we’re going to stretch the meaning of “beginner.” We included CyberLink PowerDirector on this list because its interface is, at the end of the day, pretty straightforward. Head to the product page, run through the tutorials, and you’ll be alright. There is within the interface, however, an embarrassment of options and effects. If you’re not willing to invest the time in learning all of them, it can get a bit overwhelming. 
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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