When it comes to user-friendliness, sophisticated features and ways to output your video, nothing beats the cross-platform Adobe Premiere Elements. With genuinely inspiring but practical features, Elements’ new video collage, audio remix, enhanced face detection, haze removal and adjustment layers focus on what consumers need every day. Its companion Organizer app keeps assets organized and searchable, and the touch-friendly interface works quite well in Windows 10.
Notable features include professional-level color correction, GPU-accelerated real-time effects, video capture, and nearly all-encompassing format support. However, the free version is only capable of exporting MPEG-4 files with a resolution of up to 720p. Thankfully, Lightworks also offers traditional tools for importing, trimming, and seamlessly weaving audio and video together with a few effortless mouse clicks.

Speaking about Autofocus, lets now talk about that new dual pixel autofocus. This has been a feature in the higher end 70d, 80d and 7D Mark 2 cameras and is one of my favourite features. A few years ago, getting good autofocus in video with a DSLR was un heard of, but now with this new system it works great. So I was reall happy when the t7i included it. So how well does it work?

Cyberlink PowerDirector 16 Ultra is a prosumer video editor that aims to bring every feature under the sun to a video editor that is accessible and affordable. There’s nothing else in this price range that brings you this many well-implemented features, especially in 360 video. Complexity is its one challenge: The user interface is not always self-explanatory, and the inclusion of so many features means it can be difficult to find what you want. Read our full review. 

Corel’s Pinnacle Studio 21 Ultimate gives you everything you’ll get with the standard copy of Pinnacle Studio 21, plus a host of upgraded features. It does everything the lower version will do: giving you seamless editing interface, the ability to work in full HD, as well as a great set of features for laying out a perfect story with video. But, it will also offer you a host of post effects that put this thing way out of its price class.

If I had it to do over I would purchase a Firewire card with capture software (for a little less then I paid for this device) and edit the clips with additional software. Such software is expensive ($300 - $2000) but likely has better support. I'm thinking of purchasing the Adobe program. The DVC is adequate to capture clips as MPEG and adjust their quality.
Speaking about Autofocus, lets now talk about that new dual pixel autofocus. This has been a feature in the higher end 70d, 80d and 7D Mark 2 cameras and is one of my favourite features. A few years ago, getting good autofocus in video with a DSLR was un heard of, but now with this new system it works great. So I was reall happy when the t7i included it. So how well does it work?
Then, along comes the EOS M5 and M6. I was reluctant to take the plunge due to slow-focusing issues I'd read about. I wanted the smallest possible camera but very high quality. Then, I read that the M6 has a nearly identical APS-C sensor to the new 80D - which has even better dynamic range than my 7D Mii. Then, I thought "but it doesn't have a viewfinder." Well, heck, I take photos all the time with my phone. So, I ordered the M6 with the 15-45 kit lens. I took many test photos. The camera is very easy to work with and I was pleased with the results. Compared to my previous Canon glass, M-lenses are tiny, but they're sharp. Plus, any small faults can be corrected in software. I don't really miss the viewfinder but there is one available to attach to the hot shoe. The controls are intuitive and the touchscreen is a joy to use. Manual exposure is easy to dial in quickly.
Apple’s iMovie has long been one of the most consumer-orientated video editors out there. It’s bundled with all new Macs, and touts some serious practicality for the everyday user. The latest version of the software allows you to import and edit 4K video clips from a variety of external devices, such as smartphones and GoPro cameras, and sports a clean interface that is attractive and easy to navigate. The ability to start editing on iPhone or iPad and finish on a Mac renders it even more convenient.
We installed each video editor on a Windows 10 PC running on an Intel Core i5 processor and an Nvidia dedicated graphics card. We used each suite to edit the same two videos: a 4K NASA video from inside the International Space Station, and a 1080p game capture video from Overwatch. We tested most of the filters and transitions in each suite, and cut the same edited versions of each video in each program. We then exported the videos to various file formats and media, as well as web services, to test output quality and speed. Where software offered a notable special feature not supported in the other products, we tested it when our hardware and software setup allowed it.
Filmora Video Editor for Windows (or Filmora Video Editor for Mac) is a popular video creator for new beginners as well. It contains all the features that a beginner need to create his or her videos. Basic editing features are: cropping, splitting, merging, trimming. Stabilizing videos is available if you think your footage is not great enough. Hand-picked motion graphics, filters, overlays, transitions, split scree, titles, and more will make your videos quite different and great. Now you can download the free trial version to see whether it is suitable for you or not.
There are tons of in-program effects such as transitions, titles, credits, captions and even included audio scores, meaning you won’t get held up at any step of your editing process. There are panning and shift capabilities, high-quality post-processing zoom, as well as a plethora of color filtering plugins to give you the look you’ll need, even if the raw footage isn’t quite there. You’ll have the ability to export your movies in up to 4K resolution, and the software even supports 360-degree video projects. It’s a great powerhouse for beginners.
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