The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.
Although it’s said to created intros for video ads or promo videos with logo stingers, I see no reason it’s only for a particular user. With Intro Video Creator, you can hold your customers till the end of your videos and maximize your video ads. But if you’re not a vendor, or an affiliate, you can still try this amazing product to make intros for personal uses. It will be the savior for your boring presentation.
You can easily add video clips by browsing for videos and audios by using the corresponding button on the timeline. You can also permanent Add videos and photos button on the Home tab. The “Import from Device” option in the File Menu where one can open the Windows Video/Photo importer which allows you to apply keyword tags and saving the images and clips in an organized fashion.
With the 'Recorder' you can record your screen (Full screen or specific area) it will capture your gameplay sound as well as your own voice if you use a microphone (There is an option to disable it). The resolution and frame rates are really good, I'm also amazed that they included a 'webcam record' as well as PIP where you can include both the webcam recording with the game play recording together.
After using the camera for a couple of weeks, I ordered the M-22mm lens and the EOS lens adapter. I have a couple of older small kit lenses with longer zooms that work well on the M6. And I wanted the 22mm prime for night/low-light shots. The M lenses are so light and tiny they're super-easy to carry around. I'm leaving in a few weeks for Japan and Korea and I'm looking forward to putting this camera through its paces. Plus, it weighs only about one-fourth of my 7D with lens but is capable of similar high quality photographs.
Attract new customers, increase brand awareness, and create powerful content for your business. We give you all the tools you need to effortlessly create promotional videos for any type of business from showcasing products and services, to promoting a restaurant, real estate listing, online boutique, or more. Choose from a variety of easy-to-use templates to get started, then take advantage from all of sharing options to launch a video marketing campaign, embed your video onto your website, or download to your computer to use as a business presentation.

Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.
Advanced abilities continue to make their way into accessible, affordable, and consumer-friendly video editing software as each new generation of software is released. For example, multicam editing, which lets you switch among camera angles of the same scene shot with multiple video cameras, used to be a feature relegated to pro-level software. Now this and many other advanced effects are available in programs designed for use by nonprofessional enthusiasts.
PowerDirector Ultra is our top choice for video editing software because it's easy and enjoyable to use for beginners, causal users and seasoned editors alike. It provides all the tools you need to transform the footage on your camera into a polished video you can share with family and friends. This program helps you learn video editing without compromising the power of the tools it offers.
Here's my first experience. I use Windows 2000 on a PIII 550Mhz, with 256 RAM and 20 Gig EIDE harddrive. When Dazzle arrived, I followed the directions and installed the software and put the plug in the USB port and then discovered that this software only works with Windows 98. I visited the Dazzle web site and found out that you have to purchase a program called Movie Star is you want to use it with Windows 2000. I wound up ordering the software for [more $] plus shipping. Once, I received the new disk, I installed it, and once again, it did not detect the unit when I plugged it into the USB port. And again, I visited the Dazzle web site. I discovered that they have posted a patch for the Movie Star software that fixes "some minor problems." I downloaded and installed the patch and after rebooting the machine, I was able to get it to detect the unit.

You’ll find the familiar timeline/storyboard workflow, along with other basic tools such as titles and credits, effects and transitions, and a chroma-key (green screen). It also has some, but not all, of the advanced tools you need to make an outstanding video. You’ll get a video stabilizer to smooth out shaky footage, 4K compatibility for footage from the newest cameras, 3D editing, motion tracking and more. These are all great tools, and it’s a great bang for your buck. But there are some significant trade-offs. For example, there are no themes or templates. So, you’ll need to build every project from scratch – not very appealing to beginners. It also lacks an automatic video creator and slideshow creator, which are also great for novices. This program lacks multi-cam and 360-degree editing features that you would find on more expensive programs. If you want the newest, greatest effects and tools, this is not the program for you. In addition, the program’s interface is in bad need of a face-lift, and has been for years. It’s kind of hard to get around, and it will require working through a few projects before you can use it effectively.
True. The 80D “only” shoots up to 1080p HD. If you want 4K, look elsewhere — if you’re into landscapes or travel videography, this may matter to you. The world though is still mostly operating in 1080p. Keep in mind, 4K will multiply (significantly) your storage requirements, in addition to processing power needed to edit and render. Only you can decide if this is the time to make the jump (I still think mainstream 4K adoption is 2+ years away). I love my 4K computer monitors because fonts are razor sharp. Yet, I don’t see substantive different between 80D images and those, say, from a Panasonic G7. The latter looks somewhat digital to my eyes, though it’s still a fine little camera.
Our biggest issue with VideoPad was not knowing which features were disabled in the free version versus the trial and paid versions. We found VideoPad to be a bit slower on our transcoding tests than Hitfilm, too. But that may not matter for those looking for an app that they can use to quickly and easily edit video and then upload to the social media outlet of their choice.
Like iMovie, Movie Maker uses a simplified version of the standard video editor timeline, with clips represented by "long thumbnails." The first frame is shown at full contrast, while the following ones are faded, in a distinction between this look and iMovie's. The thumbnail tracks optionally show you the audio waveforms along the bottom, so you can see where the loud and quiet parts of your video lay. You get five size choices for the thumbs, which is probably enough, and a zoom control at the bottom lets you stretch out these clip representations. You can trim or split clips using the cursor insertion point combined with edit buttons. It's quite easy once you get used to the unique editing system used by the app: you click at a point in your clip, and can then drag the resulting insertion line around the timeline.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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