Though you can create video slideshows in the Photo app in Windows 10, it doesn’t have a standalone video editor like Windows Movie Maker for Windows 10. If you are looking for a movie maker for your Windows computer, you are in the right place. Here we will take a look at top 5 best alternatives to Windows Movie Maker to allow you to create the best art you can.
This video editor gives you tons of control and editing power, but you'll have to know how to use it. The program could use a manual to help novice users comb through all of the features. Without that, VSDC Free Video Editor will take a lot of experimenting or previous editing know-how to figure out. It's worth spending plenty of time with, though.
Matt, and his partner Todd, have been creating videos for years, and they have spent the last six months working nonstop on creating an opportunity for you that is unlike anything you’ve ever seen… You see creating a video commercial tends to be complicated. You need access to decent graphics, a good script, and the talent to put it all together. BUT Matt and Todd have done all of that for you. These videos are all ready to go, and customizing them couldn’t be easier.
Windows Video Maker is an easy-to-use solution ideal for beginners. Although the program is offered for free and come standard on virtually every windows PC, it provides all the basic features for a perfect introduction. The software utilizes the most common workflow elements of the professional video editing systems. However, it offers an intuitive interface that is easy to navigate even for the novice editors. The interface provides a simplified version of a standard video editor timeline. The timeline features clips that are characterized by Long thumbnails and ease of use.
With the popularity of video content today, you'd think Microsoft would make a simple video editing tool even more prolific and available than they even had with Windows Movie Maker. Many times small business and particularly individuals, don't have the funds available for the more involved editing programs, or the time to learn those with huge learning curves to create even the simplest results.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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