There are two different licenses you can choose from with Lightworks: "Free" and "Pro." (The latter of which, as you might have guessed, requires that you cough up some cash.) The main difference between the two licenses is that the Pro version offers more features, including stereoscopic output and advanced project sharing. But the free version is still quite powerful, providing 100+ effects and supporting multicam editing.
All the video editing programs we reviewed can help you blend your footage, audio clips and images to create new and unique videos. They also all offer basic nonlinear video editing tools. Timelines, storyboards, transitions, titles and audio editing are all common fare for the products we reviewed. These applications also have video effect libraries. The number of available effects varies from program to program; however, a library with more than 500 effects is usually sufficient for any non-professional project.
BTW, for whatever the reason, Canon still does not include a lens hood with the bundle. A bit odd that. So factor in about $35 for that (note that the hood from the older 18-135mm lens included with the 70D won’t work, you’ll need the EW-73D). Plus don’t forget you should really add a UV filter to protect your lens. I recommend a 67mm B+W (Hoya is good too) which won’t break the bank.

We realize that when you make a decision to buy Video Editing Software it’s important not only to see how experts evaluate it in their reviews, but also to find out if the real people and companies that buy it are actually satisfied with the product. That’s why we’ve created our behavior-based Customer Satisfaction Algorithm™ that gathers customer reviews, comments and Windows Movie Maker reviews across a wide range of social media sites. The data is then presented in an easy to digest form showing how many people had positive and negative experience with Windows Movie Maker. With that information at hand you should be equipped to make an informed buying decision that you won’t regret.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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