Although this software makes a decent job, it has its cons. For example, I don´t like that there aren´t any options to directly add text to a piece of video, and it´s even worse that you cannot export your own custom font styles into the software. It would be a great and awesome addition if there was on option inside Movie Maker that allowed users to drag and drop text, images and any other objects that made video creation and editing more sophisticated.
I found out about VSDC from an internet search, after realising that my video editing needs were not being met by microsoft windows video editing software, as well as not having a budget to spend on anything that only did half the job or could only read certain video file types (especially for more complex editing tasks or legacy formats). VSDC video editor is the main product I use - mainly in creating youtube videos. It takes a while to get used to the way things are played out and had to take advice from a fellow youtuber as to how to utilise the settings, but was much less difficult than other more costly software like Final Cut Pro HD, etc.
With light features also comes a light footprint, and Avidemux takes up little space compared to the other programs in our roundup. It also allows users to change extensions and select individual output formats when they’re finished editing a video, but the less-than-friendly interface makes it difficult to utilize the more intricate features and worthwhile tools. It may remain a bit buggy and prone to crashing, but the program’s defaults still work as intended, making Avidemux a standout choice once you’ve learned your way around the software. Just remember to save your work.
You might also be looking at the older T6i. I reviewed this camera a lot last year and it was a great beginners dslr. It doesn't that dual pixel autofocus, instead it has a hybrid autofocus. Personally id recommend getting the t7i instead. On the upper end you could look at the Canon 70D or 80D. I actually use a Canon 70d and love it, and the 80d is a step up again. For beginners to intermediates, the t7i will be more than capable, but if you really want a great camera, go for the 80d.
I've been a Canon fan since an old sd880 point and shoot. Moved up to a T2i and then T4i. Excellent cameras. I got caught up in the mirrorless craze and about a year ago, canon was behind the competition and i went with a Panasonic gx85. One positive for the gx85: amazing camera stabilization. However, the autofocus for video SUCKS. After a year, i started to notice that a lot, if not most, of the pictures i'd taken years ago, even with the t2i, looked better than the gx85 (i was using the pana 20mm lens). i decided to go back to canon, and even considered the 77d. As i'm reviewing pictures, i am beyond satisfied with the decision to go with the m6. The m6 with the em-f 22m lens is great. sure, i miss the in-body stabilization, and i wish it had 4k video. that's why i give this camera 4 stars (and the picture review takes a second too long). But for results, this camera produces extremely clear photos, and the autofocus in videos blows the panasonic away.
The phone also has a whole lot of connectivity features. It can connect to your phone via bluetooth and wifi, and even supports NFC for easy pairing. This is great, not just for the social-media-crazed millennial but also for backing up photos in case you find yourself running out of space on your SD card (and you didn't bring spare SD cards. SHAME!! lol). But yes, this also means you can easily share photos you just took with the T7i on social media. :-)
Added features such as time remapping for including slow motion, high-speed effects or freeze action are complemented by easily grouping or ungrouping clips on a timeline to edit in bulk or one at a time. With over 1,500 customizable effects, transitions and titles, there’s something for everyone. Even as the video itself is the focus, custom fitting your project with a soundtrack is handled well with custom-fit audio allowing your movies to both look and sound good.
Simple video editor programs have an easy or basic mode for beginners. This is distinct from the familiar timeline and storyboard modes and often reduces editing to its most basic concepts and tools. Some applications make the process even easier by scanning your media and creating a video with it automatically. The best video editing programs let you manipulate the automatically generated video after it has been compiled.
Disc authoring tools are another essential feature to consider if you intend to distribute DVDs or Blu-ray discs of your videos. Authoring options can be quite extensive; for example, you may be able to insert chapter markers, build disc menus and include extra features, just like in Hollywood-produced movies. The best video editor programs have a lot of authoring tools.

Now back to the T7i, it has Canon's latest DIGIC processor inside of it, think it is up to 7 now. The auto focus system is a dual pixel AF with phase detection which is great. My old T3i didn't have phase detection, and the way that helps is that when something is out of focused, the camera can now tell which direction it needs to go. Before the camera basically had to guess and if it got less focused, it'll then go the other way. So sometimes it'll go the right direction the first time, other times it'll have to go both ways before it finds the right direction. This sometimes meant getting the subject focused took quite some time. With this new dual pixel with phase detection, it not only knows which way to go, but it also locks into focus much quicker than before. Phase detection has been around for a few years, but the dual pixel CMOS AF is actually new, even to the pro-grade cameras, and it made its way to this prosumer grade camera which is really nice.

This program checks in at about 26MB, which isn't gigantic, but is still relatively large. For that, you'll get a program that is a dead ringer for professional editing programs. It has the same sort of timeline editing style that lets you combine multiple cuts, add transitions, and render them into a complete project. As such, it isn't very easy to use unless you really know what you're doing. Few things are labeled or intuitive, and all of your tools are spread out across multiple menus. If you can find the features, there are plenty of ways to cut, reshape, and modify your video's picture and audio, though. You can even kick the quality up to 30 FPS and 1080p HD. VSDC Free Video Editor supports just about every video format you can think of, so you'll have no problem turning any video into a project.
Other recent features include a basic audio editor, the option to make previews for apps you’ve developed, and the even ability to make your own movie trailers complete with transitions and end credits. It’s not a tour de force in terms of video editing, but it’s perfectly suitable for home videos and minor projects. Consider combining it with free audio recording software!
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