Mobile video editing software. Professional video editing software tools can be expected to go mobile following the trend set by top-quality photo editing systems such as Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop that launched their smartphone editions a couple of year ago. Now, we can expect vendors of video editing software platforms to launch mobile apps to provide seamless mobility and ease of use.

Like iMovie, Movie Maker uses a simplified version of the standard video editor timeline, with clips represented by "long thumbnails." The first frame is shown at full contrast, while the following ones are faded, in a distinction between this look and iMovie's. The thumbnail tracks optionally show you the audio waveforms along the bottom, so you can see where the loud and quiet parts of your video lay. You get five size choices for the thumbs, which is probably enough, and a zoom control at the bottom lets you stretch out these clip representations. You can trim or split clips using the cursor insertion point combined with edit buttons. It's quite easy once you get used to the unique editing system used by the app: you click at a point in your clip, and can then drag the resulting insertion line around the timeline.
I like that Windows Movie Maker makes my life easier and helps me earn a few extra dollars. And how? Well, as it´s super easy to use, I only have to drag and drop a video (with no audio) inside the panel of Movie Maker. After this, I just add a few special effects from the upper menu, and finally, I add audio (that contains subliminal affirmations) in an easy way by using again the drag-and-drop function that this software allows. Everything I´ve just said is what I like about Windows Movie Maker.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
The easiest way to get video clips into Movie Maker is to tap the "Click here to browse for videos and photos" button in the main timeline area. There's also a permanent Add videos and photos button on the Home tab. Each button opens the Pictures library, where most people's point-and-shoot videos land when they import from camera media. There's also an "Import from Device" choice in the File menu; this just opens the Windows photo/video importer, which actually does a decent job of letting you apply keyword tags and saves the image and clips to date-and-time-organized folders—not unlike iPhoto's "Events." And finally, you can start capturing video from your PC's webcam.
Hay un par de cosas que no me gustan tanto: lo primero es que algunos videos cortos (menos de un par de mega bytes) pueden retrasar el software, y te llevará mucho tiempo. para terminar de subirlos a Windows Movie Maker. Por ejemplo, a veces, cargo un video corto para editar, y está listo en unos segundos. Pero luego, cargo otro video más corto para editar, pero esto lleva mucho tiempo para estar listo. Lo último que no me gusta es que el software deja de funcionar algunas veces. 
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