We realize that when you make a decision to buy Video Editing Software it’s important not only to see how experts evaluate it in their reviews, but also to find out if the real people and companies that buy it are actually satisfied with the product. That’s why we’ve created our behavior-based Customer Satisfaction Algorithm™ that gathers customer reviews, comments and Windows Movie Maker reviews across a wide range of social media sites. The data is then presented in an easy to digest form showing how many people had positive and negative experience with Windows Movie Maker. With that information at hand you should be equipped to make an informed buying decision that you won’t regret.

One of the things I really like about working in Movie Maker is that most of the effects, transitions, and themes preview automatically when you just hover the mouse cursor over their buttons. Another plus is the undo and redo buttons are right up top—video editing is a very trial-and-error process—but I suppose it's too much to ask for a history window in such a simple application.
Speaking about Autofocus, lets now talk about that new dual pixel autofocus. This has been a feature in the higher end 70d, 80d and 7D Mark 2 cameras and is one of my favourite features. A few years ago, getting good autofocus in video with a DSLR was un heard of, but now with this new system it works great. So I was reall happy when the t7i included it. So how well does it work?
We installed each video editor on a Windows 10 PC running on an Intel Core i5 processor and an Nvidia dedicated graphics card. We used each suite to edit the same two videos: a 4K NASA video from inside the International Space Station, and a 1080p game capture video from Overwatch. We tested most of the filters and transitions in each suite, and cut the same edited versions of each video in each program. We then exported the videos to various file formats and media, as well as web services, to test output quality and speed. Where software offered a notable special feature not supported in the other products, we tested it when our hardware and software setup allowed it.

For our speed comparison, we tested all of the Windows and cross-platform video editing software  on an HP Spectre x360 convertible laptop running Windows 10 Home. The laptop's 64-bit Intel Core i5 processor, with a 5200U CPU, runs at 2.2 GHz on an Intel HD Graphics 5500 system and has 8GB of RAM. We tested iMovie on a MacBook Air (late 2013) with a 1.7-GHz Intel Core i7 processor, Intel HD Graphics 5000 and 8GB of RAM, and running macOS Sierra v. 10.12.1.


Headquartered in New York City, Animoto is online and mobile video maker which enables a user to choose his own pictures, music, clips and turns into magical video slideshows. Founded in 2005, the website creator offers great digital experience and cloud-computing service with options like vast music library and video style options. Animoto bags second position in the countdown.

Ok—so to those of you working with PCs, this one won’t really apply; but we’d remiss to leave it off the list. If you’re looking for simplicity and elegance, it doesn’t get much better than Apple iMovie. iMovie’s ten high-fidelity filters are some of the classiest in the video editing game; and if you’re shooting on your iPhone, or have been editing a project on your iPad, you can use AirDrop to wirelessly and seamlessly transfer your project over to your Mac.


GoPlay is a powerful screen recorder & video editor for PC, Android and IOS device. It can capture your device’s screen and save it as a HD video. In addition, it can edit and create videos via importing various HD videos from the device. You may make 1080p-60fps videos easily by using the excellent functions. By dragging with a finger, it is convenient to edit videos, add subtitle and add dubbing. Besides that, you can search BGM online for videos. Moreover, rich video filters makes movie-level effects available.
I sincerely believe that if you purchase any of these products that they will NOT work with a PS3 game system. I get the same thing that others get ... "no input signal" ... from the Pinnacle Studio 14 software included with the Dazzle. However I have the same software game for the PC, and despite TWO different capture attempts with other 3rd party software (which have no trouble capturing screen activities otherwise), the UbiSoft game could not be captured at all. Therefore, if you're using a PS3 and you want to capture your gameplay as video you'd better look elsewhere! I KNOW it can be done because the same game(s) ARE captured by others and you can see the videos on YouTube, so there must be a way. I just haven't found it here with the 'Dazzle'. Frankly, I'm not really dazzled by this hardware. Of interesting note there are two other video capture devices sold by Avid/Pinnacle, however they seem to contradict themselves with their Specifications Pages and Feature Pages. In one the Features says you can capture video from '... game systems and others...' however on the same device's Specifications page nowhere does it stipulate which gaming systems you can capture video from! In the other device it's just the reverse (i.e. Spec page says "... game systems...", and the Features page says nothing about gaming systems). Perhaps it's the PS3, or the Software Programs' video is encoded prohibiting captures? Who knows, perhaps this is a good product for video captures from other sources, but this just doesn't work for my PS3!
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
Added features such as time remapping for including slow motion, high-speed effects or freeze action are complemented by easily grouping or ungrouping clips on a timeline to edit in bulk or one at a time. With over 1,500 customizable effects, transitions and titles, there’s something for everyone. Even as the video itself is the focus, custom fitting your project with a soundtrack is handled well with custom-fit audio allowing your movies to both look and sound good.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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