Those that have followed my video posts here on Stark Insider over the years know that I’m a die-hard 70D fan. I’ve used it to shoot interviews, live music concerts, backstage Broadway segments, and various food and travel episodes. I especially like the flip-out LCD (handy for framing shots when holding the camera high or very low), the sweet Dual Pixel auto-focus with subject tracking, and quiet performance of Canon’s STM lenses.
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It starts with its simplest feature: a storyboard mode that allows you to lay out your narrative on a simpler, at-a-glance screen. That way if you don’t want to drill down to the details, you don’t have to get bogged down with all kinds of extra proprietary controls. But if you do want to drill down to a more detailed approach, you can do so with its Details mode that allows you to mix in 200 multimedia tracks, giving you seemingly endless possibilities for your project.
Tyler explained that the software you buy should complement the hardware you use, as well as the type of project you’re working on. “You want to have software that will work well with your phone, digital camera, action cam or whatever you’re shooting on. If you plan on shooting on a lot of different devices, you want a program that’s compatible with a lot of different formats.”
While it is simple, it lacks many of the more advanced features found in commercial video editing software, which shouldn't matter to the majority of users of this product. Another issue is that Microsoft has virtually dropped support for this, and is potentially looking to release a newer version at some point. Competitors on the market such as iMovie have continued to be supported with newer features such as 4K support.
Purchasing the full version of VideoStudio Ultimate X10 adds a whole extra set of options that beginners will quickly love, including multi-monitor support, easier title creation, and even stop-motion animation. Corel supports almost every output format imaginable, so it's ideal for sharing socially or for hosting online for the world to see. Another highlight for beginners is the inclusion of storyboard mode, which will help draft the exact vision they have in mind for a finished product without wasting hours and days on edits that may never see the light of day.

When using this software, I was able to create videos that helped me teach and motivate students. I was also able to make videos that clarified concepts that we were working on in the classroom. I was able to teach students how to use the software which they did wonderfully. It brought joy to the classroom and the kids were doing something that they clearly enjoyed.
While most professional-grade software can handle multi-cam editing, Premiere Pro goes one step beyond, handling as many sources as necessary with as many angles as required. The inclusion of the bundled Lumetri Color Panel allows advanced color adjustments to be handled with ease. Additionally, Adobe’s integration with After Effects and Photoshop adds even more reason for professional grade editors to choose Premiere Pro.
After all, if you say that it’s just video intros, I hope you understand that it’s the opening for everything, including your earning cash. Folks can only buy your product if they know it. And if you fail to make them watch your video promo, how can they know your product exists. So, at the end of Intro Video Creator Review, I hope you have better understanding about this amazing product and buy it before the price rises up.
But the supplied "MovieStar" capture/editing software's editing functions won't work and the program remains unstable. I keep getting errors like "Unable to build temporary movie for unknown reasons." Of course I read their FAQ and the manual (no section describing the problem.....no troubleshooting section). So far, I am unable to do anything with the clips but trim the ends to shorten them. To do this I have to "produce" a new clip for each editing function. I cannot combine clips by inserting transitions. And it still crashes the system....even with nothing else running. I suspect it is not compatible with my GeForce 256 video card. So I emailed their "support" address through their website [...] explaining the problem and got back a computerized response. Then I called their "support" number (long distance.....not an 800#) and was put on hold with the explanation that the California phone system was on the bugger implying that if I couldn't get hold of them it wasn't their fault. So, I left them a voice mail message with my office number. They called and left me a email where I was supposed to be able to get email support from them (anthonyp@dazzle.com) which was returned to sender.
The basic video editing operations such as trimming, splitting are available from the last menu—Edit—and they also snap into view if you double click a clip in your timeline. The Trim tool simply adds start and end handles to the preview window's scrubber line, but you can do the same thing from the main timeline by tapping "Set start point" or "Set end point."

Windows Video Maker is an easy-to-use solution ideal for beginners. Although the program is offered for free and come standard on virtually every windows PC, it provides all the basic features for a perfect introduction. The software utilizes the most common workflow elements of the professional video editing systems. However, it offers an intuitive interface that is easy to navigate even for the novice editors. The interface provides a simplified version of a standard video editor timeline. The timeline features clips that are characterized by Long thumbnails and ease of use.

The granddaddy of video editing, Adobe Premiere Pro is the cross-platform, uber-popular timeline based video editor that’s long set the standard for video editing software. Capable of tackling nearly any type of video format, Adobe’s software is ready to produce video for any type of professional production, including film, television and the Web. Premiere Pro offers enough horsepower to handle 360-degree virtual reality video to 8K footage all in native format. It can even import and export footage from competitive software such as Final Cut Pro.
I'll keep this short ... despite a bad review on Amazon, I bought this product. I received it promptly, I installed the highly regarded Pinnacle Studio v14 software FIRST, on my computer, AS INSTRUCTED. I connected the Canon DV tape camcorder to the Dazzle with the 'AV Out' cable that came with the camcorder originally, plugged the Dazzle into a front-mounted USB port on the computer, launched Studio, and imported 6 year old video from tape to disk by simply hitting the 'play' button on the camcorder ... I have a lot more work to do for video editing, but this beats the HELL out of installing a machine specific capture card. I can't think of a simpler way to capture tape-based video. You can pick from a variety of file outputs, I used AVI and I'll probably experiment more and use whatever burns to DVD the best for HD tv viewing. I was dreading the pain of capturing old video, but this has made it much easier than I expected, at a very reasonable cost considering the hardware/software package you get. In fact, it works well enough that I'm willing to stick with my DV tape camera for a while longer. More importantly I have old but good quality video of family, dogs and fun that I can now capture and save to DVD.

Another impressive effect that has made its way into consumer-level video editing software is motion tracking, which lets you attach an object or effect to something moving in your video. You might use it to put a blur over the face of someone you don't want to show up in your video. You specify the target face, and the app takes care of the rest, tracking the face and moving the effect to follow it. This used to be the sole province of special effects software such as Adobe After Effects. Corel VideoStudio was the first of the consumer products to include motion tracking, and it still leads the pack in the depth and usability of its motion-tracking tool, though several others now include the capability.

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This open-source software program runs smoothly with Windows 10. It has a very user-friendly interface makes navigating the program easy for those with a little experience in video editing. Your files can even be extended using third-party video filters and it supports batch processing which means it is possible to handle multiple videos at the same time. Unfortunately, even with its friendly interface, this program can be a little difficult to understand for beginners.

The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
It splits its interface into two modules: Express and Advanced. These two modes function similar to the storyboard and timeline modes most other software use. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll be pleased with the quality of the transitions and effects the software has to help you create videos. Nero Video also supports third-party add-ons. However, it doesn't provide many exporting options, so check that it supports the formats you want to use before you buy. Also, even though this DVD authoring software comes with dozens of transitions, text effects and other effects, it doesn't have as many as other products we reviewed. Still, there may be enough for your needs. This application can create chapters automatically, and you can also insert music and voiceovers. When importing files, you can capture video, audio and images from your computer or any device you connect to it. Before you take the time to burn your project to a disc, you can use the playback option to see how it will work. This DVD authoring software can burn your movies to DVD, AVCHD, CD and Blu-ray discs, as well as save files on your computer or upload them to the internet.
EZ Video Creator is a first of it’s kind “done for you” cloud-based video editor that allows you to create professional-quality commercials in less than 90 seconds. Loaded up with dozens of video templates on a wide variety of topics, EZ Video Creator will be absolutely irresistible. It’s no secret that video is crazy hot right now. Thousands upon thousands of dollars are being made each and every day through the selling of commercials. Now it’s time for YOU to get a piece of that action.
Intro Video Creator is an Adobe Air software that makes 2D and 3D video intros in 3 clicks. In particularly, it’s also used to create Logo Stingers. The app allows users to edit the music tracks, text fonts and the background, as well. The final video can be exported as MP4. Users can merge the video together or split them apart. They also are allowed to use the video for personal or business purposes. The source of material of this app has many catchy samples you can use. If you want, you can add your own into it.
4) As some other reviewers have pointed out, the Dazzle chip is not a HD device. Even though Dazzle Video Creator Plus HD is it's name, it does not record HD video. This is because S-video and component (the two types of ports on the capture card) are not capable of recording in HD quality. What HD refers to is Pinnacle Studio's ability to edit and render HD video.

After using the camera for a couple of weeks, I ordered the M-22mm lens and the EOS lens adapter. I have a couple of older small kit lenses with longer zooms that work well on the M6. And I wanted the 22mm prime for night/low-light shots. The M lenses are so light and tiny they're super-easy to carry around. I'm leaving in a few weeks for Japan and Korea and I'm looking forward to putting this camera through its paces. Plus, it weighs only about one-fourth of my 7D with lens but is capable of similar high quality photographs.

I like that Windows Movie Maker makes my life easier and helps me earn a few extra dollars. And how? Well, as it´s super easy to use, I only have to drag and drop a video (with no audio) inside the panel of Movie Maker. After this, I just add a few special effects from the upper menu, and finally, I add audio (that contains subliminal affirmations) in an easy way by using again the drag-and-drop function that this software allows. Everything I´ve just said is what I like about Windows Movie Maker.
I decided to upgrade (pay) when the free version only allowed 5 min videos max. So I paid for a gold class and now I am told I can only make 10 min videos - WTF! You would assume once you pay you can make much longer videos! That cost me $42 AUD. I also notice that once the video is "completed" some of the processed video is black and only has sound. Windows Movie Maker (which was actually FREE) never did this, and its controls were much easier to use. The controls are also very hard to use.
The easiest way to get video clips into Movie Maker is to tap the "Click here to browse for videos and photos" button in the main timeline area. There's also a permanent Add videos and photos button on the Home tab. Each button opens the Pictures library, where most people's point-and-shoot videos land when they import from camera media. There's also an "Import from Device" choice in the File menu; this just opens the Windows photo/video importer, which actually does a decent job of letting you apply keyword tags and saves the image and clips to date-and-time-organized folders—not unlike iPhoto's "Events." And finally, you can start capturing video from your PC's webcam.
However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.

Other great inclusions are the program’s instant auto-save functionality, which works flawlessly in the background, and the ability to select Avid and Final Cut Pro keyboard layouts if you refuse to adopt Lightworks’ default design. Despite its brawny capabilities, it’s quick and on-point, and the full-screen interface is polished and well organized as well. Also, given the open-source nature of the software and steep learning curve associated with the freemium product, the program’s forums are more bustling than most.
Windows Movie Maker is a free video creator that is probably already installed on your computer since it is included in Windows Essential 2012, and if it is not, you can easily download it on www.windows.microsoft.com. This software is very easy to use, you only have to import photos or videos on your computer from any device, your flash drive, your camera or your phone. Your photos will appear in your Photo Gallery once you import them and later you can use them when you will make your movie in Movie Maker. You can also record a video from your webcam and add it to the Movie Maker. Movie Maker will let you create professional movie with transition, special effects and music.
True. The 80D “only” shoots up to 1080p HD. If you want 4K, look elsewhere — if you’re into landscapes or travel videography, this may matter to you. The world though is still mostly operating in 1080p. Keep in mind, 4K will multiply (significantly) your storage requirements, in addition to processing power needed to edit and render. Only you can decide if this is the time to make the jump (I still think mainstream 4K adoption is 2+ years away). I love my 4K computer monitors because fonts are razor sharp. Yet, I don’t see substantive different between 80D images and those, say, from a Panasonic G7. The latter looks somewhat digital to my eyes, though it’s still a fine little camera.