Dual Pixel AF is, no question, best-in-class. And it’s still the primary reason to look at the 80D (or even the older 70D from 2013). In my experience focus is superb — dead accurate, fast tracking, silent. Perfect for video. Even if you’re a purist, and prefer manual focus (which you should always learn) nailing initial focus is a treat with the DPAF (45-point); then once you’ve got that you can flick the switch to manual to tweak from there or adjust as a scene develops.

Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.

But the supplied "MovieStar" capture/editing software's editing functions won't work and the program remains unstable. I keep getting errors like "Unable to build temporary movie for unknown reasons." Of course I read their FAQ and the manual (no section describing the problem.....no troubleshooting section). So far, I am unable to do anything with the clips but trim the ends to shorten them. To do this I have to "produce" a new clip for each editing function. I cannot combine clips by inserting transitions. And it still crashes the system....even with nothing else running. I suspect it is not compatible with my GeForce 256 video card. So I emailed their "support" address through their website [...] explaining the problem and got back a computerized response. Then I called their "support" number (long distance.....not an 800#) and was put on hold with the explanation that the California phone system was on the bugger implying that if I couldn't get hold of them it wasn't their fault. So, I left them a voice mail message with my office number. They called and left me a email where I was supposed to be able to get email support from them (anthonyp@dazzle.com) which was returned to sender.
The MS website offers virtually no educational materials on their program. All it has in terms of user support is a help service you can contact by email and a forum. The Movavi site, on the other hand, provides a wide variety of useful content, including FAQs, manuals, and video guides with regular updates. If something is not working properly or there’s an error of any kind, you can contact the company’s live chat service to get help in real time.

I'm in the market for a free or inexpensive movie editor. I am hoping to find editing software that allows you to attach audio clips to still photos or video clips. Imagine that you have 20 vacation photos each playing for 5 seconds. You add audio to describe each photo. Then, you drag the 3rd photo to the 11th position. I need (want) an editor that will drag your audio along with the photo. In Windows Movie Maker when you moved a photo the audio did not drag along with it.


Increasingly, new capabilities trickle down from professional-level software to the consumer category. That's a good thing for nonprofessional movie editors, since the more-consumer-oriented software makes formerly difficult procedures a cinch for them. Read on for a survey of the latest trends in video editing software and our top picks in the field.
Taking a vacation this summer to the shore, overseas, a theme park, or somewhere exotic, like Cleveland? There's a good chance you're going to want to film some of your trip. But instead of letting it languish on your smartphone, DSLR or compact camera, you'll want to polish it up to share with family and friends. That's where a good video editing program comes in.
This free video editor makes it a cinch to export your creations to YouTube, Facebook, Dropbox, Flickr, Google Drive and an assortment of mobile devices through a simple pull-down menu. You have to sign in to these services first. And while YouTube uploaded directly to my channel without incident, you may have to save your video to your hard drive with social media specs and then upload to the social network yourself.

These aren't just your quick videos that give a few tips. These videos are based on the weekly Video Creators podcast and take time to go more in-depth and explore the details of growing a YouTube channel and an audience. Sometimes they're live streams, other times they're long-form interviews. Either way, you'll enjoy digging deeper into audience growth topics in this playlist.
The Dazzle Multimedia DM4100 Digital Video Creator is very useful to import video from your TV, VCR or DVD player into your PC for editing and then converting to PC video formats. The device is exceptionally good for making videos for use on the Web or as e-mail attachments. Thanks to its use of USB its very simple to install and can be "hot-swaped" with other USB device without rebooting your computer.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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