Filmora Video Editor for Windows (or Filmora Video Editor for Mac) is a popular video creator for new beginners as well. It contains all the features that a beginner need to create his or her videos. Basic editing features are: cropping, splitting, merging, trimming. Stabilizing videos is available if you think your footage is not great enough. Hand-picked motion graphics, filters, overlays, transitions, split scree, titles, and more will make your videos quite different and great. Now you can download the free trial version to see whether it is suitable for you or not.

BIGVU is a mobile app-based video production tool that allows individual and small size video developers to shoot and post videos on various platforms. BIGVU offers three independent solutions - Social Video Creator, Video Presentation and Mobile Journalism. The suite can be used to create a variety of video contents such as marketing videos, sales pitches, news, social posts, training videos and online tutorials.


We’ve now got 1080p recording at 60 frames per second, which to be fair was a long time in the making. That means you can get some pretty nice slow motion in post. Sure theres not 4k video recording, but i wouldnt trade for the great dual pixel autofocus in video. Like i said before, it works fantastically. Especialyl for beginerrs who aren't used to manually focusing, essentially now they can just point the camera where they want it and it’ll be in focus. On the side here we have a dedicated microphone input which means you can add a shotgun mic on top, which is something id recommend as well.
I've been a Canon fan since an old sd880 point and shoot. Moved up to a T2i and then T4i. Excellent cameras. I got caught up in the mirrorless craze and about a year ago, canon was behind the competition and i went with a Panasonic gx85. One positive for the gx85: amazing camera stabilization. However, the autofocus for video SUCKS. After a year, i started to notice that a lot, if not most, of the pictures i'd taken years ago, even with the t2i, looked better than the gx85 (i was using the pana 20mm lens). i decided to go back to canon, and even considered the 77d. As i'm reviewing pictures, i am beyond satisfied with the decision to go with the m6. The m6 with the em-f 22m lens is great. sure, i miss the in-body stabilization, and i wish it had 4k video. that's why i give this camera 4 stars (and the picture review takes a second too long). But for results, this camera produces extremely clear photos, and the autofocus in videos blows the panasonic away.
Though Mac users don't have the sheer number of software choices available for PCs, Apple fans interested in editing video are well served, by four products in particular. At the entry level, the surprisingly capable and enjoyable-to-use iMovie comes free with every Mac sold since at least 2011. iMovie only offers two video tracks, but does good job with chroma-keying, and its Trailers feature makes it easy to produce slick, Hollywood-style productions.
Next getting the software to work was another challange. despite having a fast machine with a lot of RAM, I found the Movie Star program to be very unstable. I was able to capture up to 60 minutes of video and save it to the MPEG format, but everytime I tried to edit or export the video as Windows Media or Real, it crashed the machine. I downloaded a copy of Ulead's Video Studio, but couldn't figure out how to import MPEG files. I finally bit the bullet and wound up downloading a free 30-day trial of Adobe Premier. I found Premier to be a very stable and easy to use program. I just wish it didn't cost [so much!]
Other great inclusions are the program’s instant auto-save functionality, which works flawlessly in the background, and the ability to select Avid and Final Cut Pro keyboard layouts if you refuse to adopt Lightworks’ default design. Despite its brawny capabilities, it’s quick and on-point, and the full-screen interface is polished and well organized as well. Also, given the open-source nature of the software and steep learning curve associated with the freemium product, the program’s forums are more bustling than most.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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