The best DVD creator software should also have all the qualities of a top-notch video editing program. There are DVD creators that focus solely on authoring and have few or no editing tools. If you just want to burn finished videos to DVDs, you may want to look into one of these applications. However, if you’re building your own creation from scratch, it’s best to buy an authoring program that has a robust set of video-editing features.
Blender is mainly 3D animation program but it has the best video editing and compose tool set that is hard to compete with. You can download this software on www.blender.org. The best thing about Blender is that they are always improving, new versions of the programs are released extremely quickly, and there are new and exciting features. It is also a difficult program to learn, but once you get used to it, you can do everything you want with it. Blender has a new rendering engine which is called Cycles and it offers amazing and realistic rendering. The modeling tools are easy to use. You have keyboard shortcuts for a fast workflow. With this software you can transform a model into a real character in just minutes. It also offers amazing simulations, whether you need rain, fire or hair that blows in the wind.
Unlike some other users I found I could transfer to the computer without a problem through a USB interface even though I have a USB keyboard connected. Also I found that I could adjust contrast, brightness and color successfully and the quality of my videos were improved significantly. You do have to have the DVC connected with the source on when you load the "MovieStar" software to manipulate captured clips(I've no idea why...it's in there FAQ but can't find that in the manual)and I had to close out all the other running programs but Windows Explorer to make this work. This is on a machine running an ABIT BE6-II and an intel 700MHz CPU with 512Mb of ram.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
×