On the nikon side you might looking at the Nikon D3400 or the Nikon D5600. Both of these cameras were released last year and they’re both very nice. The D5600 is the most similar and also has a fully articulating screen. If you’ve never used a nikon dslr before it might take you a little while to get used, but again both of these cameras are quite good although I would still give the advantage to the T7i.
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The other advantage of having an APS-C camera is your lens selection. Obviously you get to choose between both EF and EF-S lenses, but that's not what I mean by it. Canon has a very wide selection of EF lenses and you will read a lot about what lenses are great and what lenses are not so great. Well, the faults with the "not so great" lenses typically happen toward the outer edges. That's typically where the complaints would be while the center of the image will generally be good across almost all of Canon's quality EF lens selection. Well, since the APS-C sensor "crops" the image out of the center, you effectively crop out the "bad" parts of even the so-called "bad" lenses. So actually a lot of these lenses that get bad reviews, if you use them on an APS-C camera such as the T7i, you will never notice the faults people complain about with those lenses. I mean, this isn't ALWAYS the case, but if you read the consensus is that the outer parts of the image have distortion or is too dark while the center is fine, you likely would not notice those problems, or will notice them a lot less, while using the T7i combined with that lens.
Camera works great. Takes amazing video and photos. You have to be very careful with that screen on the back though. I already shattered it by knocking over my tripod and it landed against a padded backpack hanging against my closet door. I have no idea how it shattered?? But lesson learned, be very careful with this one. I have since bought a neoprene case to put on it when not in use. I love the camera still. It is a great size and light weight, but a very solid and durable body. This combo is a great deal as well, saving you around $65-70. Would definitely recommend this camera to anyone.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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