Ignore all the unfavorable reviews of the Dazzle DM4100, unless you like AOL or would recommend AOL to a friend. I tend to be a tough critic when it comes to inferior technology, but the Dazzle TRULY IMPRESSED ME!!! 15 minutes to install on an AMD K6-450 notebook, default settings, smooth 30fps better-than-VHS capture, and a reasonable price. Yes, the video out works well too, naysayers! OK, I had to figure out a couple of software issues as I experimented with options, but if you can't deal with software quirks, you shouldn't own a PC !! ....but if you do, you probably think "AOL is #1" means AOL is the best. No, it just means an unrelenting high-budget sales campaign can easily brainwash the cranially-challenged. The rest of us just ignore the ads, and enjoy using quality products like the Dazzle 4100, without opening the manual, or whining to/about tech support.
Another thing I don't like is how they decided to "encode" their batteries. I'm sure there's some advantage to it, most likely safety to ensure you're using a genuine Canon battery they can quality control, but how it's affected me is that now buying an aftermarket battery means that you won't get a read-out of how much power you have left while using them. Not a huge deal, but it is kind of annoying. I like to have spare batteries, but at almost $60 a pop, no way I can afford to have a genuine Canon one. So I'll have to live with one made by a 3rd party and not knowing how much power is left in it if I have to use it... It also means the Canon charger will refuse to charge these batteries, so the 3rd party charger will be required to charge up these 3rd party batteries...

A lot of people ask what sort of gear we use for the Stark Insider YouTube channel. We don’t do vlogs, but I would suggest this is a highly flexible camera rig for just about every possible scenario. You could use it for weddings (though if you have the budget the Sony a7S is superb in low light and one of my top 5 camera buys), interviews, sporting events, birthdays, documentary work, live concerts… and, on and on.
All the other tools you would expect from consumer-level video editing software are present and work excellently. You can add titles, closed captions and other text to your video project with a few simple clicks. You also get a video stabilizer that smooths out shaky video, as well as a library of over 500 effects and transitions for you to choose from.
Another feature that's new to me coming from a T3i that I love is the grid that you can have showing in the view-finder. Before you had to buy a replacement viewfinder eye-piece to get a grid and they didn't offer one for the T3i. Now it's done digitally and it's awesome. My only gripe is that you can't actually customize what grid pattern you want. But it's definitely a step in the right direction.
There is an awesome video creator called "VideoMakerFX". Althought, it may seem that it is a typical software of that type,but it has a lot distinquishable features,which will help you to create the best video. However, it costs quite a lot, but you can download it with a 40% discount using the following link: https://bit.ly/2Obzouh Thank you for spending time to read my comment - have a nice day! Eugene.
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This was released at the same time as the T7i and it’s a fantastic camera. It’s got the same dual pixel autofocus but also has a few minor differences. Firstly we’ve got this lcd screen on the top. This gives you a little bit more information without having to look through the viewfinder. We’ve also got this scroll wheel on the back. To be honest, these aren’t huge differences between the two and the t7i is a smaller camera, so if you can live without those two features, the t7i will be good for you.

What I liked the most is the video editing because even if you are new to all of this, it will be easy for you to follow the tutorial and be as professional as all the other video editors. There is nothing complicated in the program, I've tried many other video editing programs, but this one by far the easiest of all and still give you the most satisfying results.


Another thing I don't like is how they decided to "encode" their batteries. I'm sure there's some advantage to it, most likely safety to ensure you're using a genuine Canon battery they can quality control, but how it's affected me is that now buying an aftermarket battery means that you won't get a read-out of how much power you have left while using them. Not a huge deal, but it is kind of annoying. I like to have spare batteries, but at almost $60 a pop, no way I can afford to have a genuine Canon one. So I'll have to live with one made by a 3rd party and not knowing how much power is left in it if I have to use it... It also means the Canon charger will refuse to charge these batteries, so the 3rd party charger will be required to charge up these 3rd party batteries...
With a full support for dozens of video codecs and formats including but not limiting to AVI, MP4, MKV, MPG, WMV, 3GP, FLV for video; MP3, WAV, WMA, FLAC, PCM, OGG, AAC, M4A, AMR for audio; and BMP, JPG, PNG, PSD, ICO, TIFF for images, VSDC Free Video Editor provides one of the easiest ways to combine multiple source chunks in different formats into a resulting high-quality video. A bunch of filters can turn even a commonplace video sequence into a classy pro-quality movie, while thousands of video and audio effects conveniently grouped into four categories help you making your video to look and sound more dynamic. Not only does VSDC Free Video Editor offer powerful video editing capabilities, it is also surprisingly easy to use. Forget video conversion back and forth between different formats. Import from any devices and cams, including GoPro and drones, is available. Currently it is the only free video editor that allows users to export in a new H.265/HEVC codec, something essential for those working with 4K and HD. New versions have also enabled an easy export to social networks: special profiles for YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. All multimedia processing done from one app: video editing capabilities reinforced by a video converter, a screen capture, a video capture, a disc burner and a YouTube uploader.

Because it's so deeply entwined with the macOS, iMovie was one of the fastest apps when it came to encoding video. Once that's finished, it also gives you plenty of sharing options: You can upload directly to YouTube, Facebook and Vimeo, and share any video frame as an image. When you couple iMovie with iMovie Theater and iCloud, you can also view your creations on any Apple device or via Apple TV.

Compared to HitFilm's high-energy interface, VideoPad has a simple, soothing look which makes it more approachable for novices. It works with both Macs and PCs and still lets you edit 360-degree video with the same ease as you would traditional movies, though adding text to 360-degree clips can be a bit tricky. VideoPad also lacks some of the advanced features you'll find with HitFilm, like multicam editing, high-end special effects and motion tracking, but you can purchase a number of add-ons to expand VideoPad's feature set.
Windows Movie Maker is free video editing software available on virtually every PC. Developed by Microsoft as part of the standard program suite, it was included in Windows XP and, more recently, Windows 7 and Windows 8. Even though it is not supported for Windows 10, you can still download Windows Movie Maker and install it on this newest operating system, as well. But should you really do that? You can try a powerful alternative like Movavi Video Editor Plus that gives you access to a wider range of tools and is also available to Mac users.
I love this camera. I recently got into film making and was looking for an entry level camera to start with, my choices were between the 80D, 77D and the T7i. Upon my research I realized that all have the same size image sensor at 24 MP and the same basic software except the 77D & T7i have the newer Digic 7 processor & 80D has the Digic 6, the 80D also has more features and is weather sealed. However, in terms of image quality on both video and photos the result is basically the same excellent!!!. The auto focus on this camera is amazing and really helps with filming at events. I think this camera is good value for your money if you are now starting out. My advice if you are looking to choose between the 3 cameras and you are new film making or photography buy this camera and invest your money in good lenses. I recently picked up the 50 mm 1.8 along with this purchase and the depth of field has taken my photos to a new level. Im pleased with this purchase.
The second big draw is communication. The app creates a unified inbox for comments on Facebook and Instagram and messages from Messenger, so that you don’t have to bounce between different apps in order to respond to people. The app doesn’t seem to cover every possible messaging vector inside of Facebook’s services, but it sounds like a handy start.
This video editor gives you tons of control and editing power, but you'll have to know how to use it. The program could use a manual to help novice users comb through all of the features. Without that, VSDC Free Video Editor will take a lot of experimenting or previous editing know-how to figure out. It's worth spending plenty of time with, though.
True. The 80D “only” shoots up to 1080p HD. If you want 4K, look elsewhere — if you’re into landscapes or travel videography, this may matter to you. The world though is still mostly operating in 1080p. Keep in mind, 4K will multiply (significantly) your storage requirements, in addition to processing power needed to edit and render. Only you can decide if this is the time to make the jump (I still think mainstream 4K adoption is 2+ years away). I love my 4K computer monitors because fonts are razor sharp. Yet, I don’t see substantive different between 80D images and those, say, from a Panasonic G7. The latter looks somewhat digital to my eyes, though it’s still a fine little camera.
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