I've been seeing a lot of attention paid to creating title effects in the applications over the past year. Apple Final Cut Pro X has added 3D title creation, which is pretty spiffy, letting you extrude 2D titles and rotate them on three axes. Corel VideoStudio in its latest version also adds 3D Titling, though not as powerful as Apple's. PowerDirector's Title Designer offers transparency, gradient color, border, blur level, and reflection in titles; Magix has impressive title templates, complete with animations. Premiere Elements offers a nifty title effect in which your video fills the text characters. Look for an application that lets you edit titles in WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) mode, so that you can type, format, and time it right over the video preview.
Another hidden "cost" is periodic or even constant in-line advertising or reminders that an upgrade is available. Our favorite program, HitFilm, never pushes an upgrade on you, but it makes you go through a social media and authorizing song and dance to download the product or switch computers. VideoPad (on the Mac) makes you verify at every launch that you are using the free version for noncommercial purposes.

If video isn’t already an important part of your content marketing strategy, odds are it’s about to be. Web content is taking a turn toward video whether SEOs and content marketers like it or not. Nearly 50% of marketers are adding YouTube and Facebook channels for video distribution in the next year; one third of online activity is spent watching video; and video itself is projected to account for more than 80% of all internet traffic by 2019. 80%!

Now one big question I know is on everyone's minds. APS-C or Full-Frame? Now the obvious answer is that if you're making money with the camera, go full-frame, if not, APS-C. But actually it's not that simple. First, there's no reason someone doing photography as a hobby shouldn't get a full-frame camera, other than the fact that they cost a whole lot more. But if you can afford it and you want the advantages of a full-frame camera (better resolutions, better low-light photography, etc.) and you don't mind the extra bulk, then why not? And on the flip-side, if you're a pro and want a smaller, less bulky camera to take with you on a shoot, then there's also no reason to say an APS-C camera will not be worth buying... But since you're looking at the T7i, let me go over a few actual advantages to an APS-C camera regardless of your status as an amateur or professional.
Vegas Movie Studio as well as you to come up with stunning videos were giving minimum effort. This software leans towards the more experienced side, and is really only suitable for those with a true passion for video editing is not only does it have a high retail price but its interface and internal elements can be too complex and confusing for those just beginning.
At $80 Corel VideoStudio Ultimate X10.5 combines an elegant and professional-feeling interface with high-end specialty features like 3D and 4K Ultra HD, making it one of the most satisfying and versatile consumer-level video editors on the market. It also has an elegant, modern-looking user interface, and can export to YouTube, Facebook, Flickr, and Vimeo with all the options you’d expect. It’s versatile, efficient, and top of its class. (Read our full review.)
As easy as CyberLink makes this software to use, there may be times when you need help. To that end, the company established DirectorZone, a community of videographers, filmmakers and aspiring editors. This allows you to connect to, collaborate with and learn from other video makers. DirectorZone is a great resource for editors of all skill levels.
PowerDirector Ultra features CyberLink’s True Theater Color technology, which analyzes the color of your footage and enhances aspects like hue, saturation and brightness. It's a great way to get Hollywood-style color treatment on your video project. You get more than enough tools to create a video that looks like it could have been made in a movie studio. You may never edit a full-length feature film with this software, but you could.
I bought this used for roughly $45. The set up wasn't too bad, of course there were things I had to figure out and work around to get this to work. The TV I used was an old tv with only composite connection, the one with red, yellow, and white. And the quality was, as you guessed, subpar at best. The biggest problem for me was the subtitles, I could barely read the blurred subtitles in my recordings. I eventually had to buy the madcatz universal cable with the S-video connection to work around this problem. You can youtube how to connect S-video with dazzle for this info.
Next, is to import the media file that you want to edit. Click on “Import” at the top left and choose the location from where you want to import the files. You can import from local drive by clicking on “Import Media Files,” download online or import from a device once you connected it to the computer. You can also, drag and drop media files to the program.
Premiere Clip is perfect for creatives whose videos are bound for social media channels like YouTube and Instagram. You can easily import video clips from places like your phone, Lightroom, Creative Cloud and Dropbox, and then use the app’s Freeform editor to trim or split clips, adjust exposure and highlights, add audio and more. And, of course, you can add filters, which is a given in today’s social media sphere.
We installed each video editor on a Windows 10 PC running on an Intel Core i5 processor and an Nvidia dedicated graphics card. We used each suite to edit the same two videos: a 4K NASA video from inside the International Space Station, and a 1080p game capture video from Overwatch. We tested most of the filters and transitions in each suite, and cut the same edited versions of each video in each program. We then exported the videos to various file formats and media, as well as web services, to test output quality and speed. Where software offered a notable special feature not supported in the other products, we tested it when our hardware and software setup allowed it.
In the production industry, when most people think about editing software, their minds don't go to Windows Movie Maker on a PC. I'm not an expert on how to achieve that, but I gather a revamped look (which seems more like a professional editing suite) that retains the intuitive, user-friendly feel would be a start. The issue may not be with Movie Maker, but more so a computer's ability to handle the rich files (raw video) and storage required to edit.

I make videos and brochures for a living, and one of the tolos I frequently use is Windows Movie Maker. There are two things I like about this software: first and foremost, is really easy to use: you can find all of the features easily on the user panel and add them with only one click, which is a pretty cool feature. The other thing I like is that adding music, credits, black and white effects, and many more additions to make your video creation more beautiful is also a piece of cake.
I've been using Canon equipment for decades. I am a photo 'enthusiast' but hardly a pro-style photog. I have used various film cameras, several Canon Rebels, EOS 7D mark 1 and mark 2 plus several 'L' lenses. All that time, I've been searching for the perfect travel camera -- I don't think it exists. I've used many small digital snappers including the Sony RX100-II, which took nice photos but was maddeningly fussy to hold and use, as well as the Fuji XT100 (great camera but fixed 40mm-equiv lens).
True. The 80D “only” shoots up to 1080p HD. If you want 4K, look elsewhere — if you’re into landscapes or travel videography, this may matter to you. The world though is still mostly operating in 1080p. Keep in mind, 4K will multiply (significantly) your storage requirements, in addition to processing power needed to edit and render. Only you can decide if this is the time to make the jump (I still think mainstream 4K adoption is 2+ years away). I love my 4K computer monitors because fonts are razor sharp. Yet, I don’t see substantive different between 80D images and those, say, from a Panasonic G7. The latter looks somewhat digital to my eyes, though it’s still a fine little camera.
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