The Full Feature Editor contains simplified versions of nearly all the tools available in professional video editing software. For example, you have access to an audio mixer that lets you fine-tune your sound, the chroma key that allows you to create green-screen effects, and a surround-sound configurator that optimizes your video for home entertainment systems and even movie theaters. These tools and others allow you to make the same type of videos as Hollywood professionals. PowerDirector is a great program not only for creating great videos, but also for learning nonlinear editing in case you decide to upgrade to professional video editing programs.
Corel’s Windows-only VideoStudio offers an equally robust set of features comparative to Adobe or CyberLink’s product line. Right off the bat, it’s easy to see why VideoStudio is a great option: It offers support for 4K, 360-degree VR, multi-cam editing, as well as a large library of royalty-free music. Beginners will quickly learn to appreciate features such as "checkmarks," which can either let you know which clips you’ve already used or can apply effects to all the clips currently in your timeline at once. Additionally, voice detection helps you match subtitles to speech in your video clips.

Every other program has dedicated tracks for each type of media such as video, audio, images, etc. The fact that you can use any media on any track makes this software much more dynamic and provides more control over your project. However, the DVD authoring tools in this program fall short of the best we tested. For example, you don’t get the ability add bonus features or save a disc image to your hard drive. While neither of these things are a deal-breaker, they’re both found in our top pick for this category.

The Express Projects module offers a library of preprogrammed video templates to choose from. PowerDirector walks you through sorting your footage, choosing the best shots for your video and letting you experiment with where to place footage in the template. This is important for two reasons: First, it allows beginner and novice users the opportunity to complete a project without being intimidated by the complexity of the software; second, it does so in a way that teaches you to use the tools in the Full Feature Editor, making the jump that much easier.
I´m sorry to say that there are a couple things I don´t like that much: the first thing is that some short videos (less than a couple mega bytes) can delay the software, and it´ll take you a long time to finish uploading them to Windows Movie Maker. For example, sometimes, I upload a short video to edit, and it´s ready in a few seconds. But then, I upload another shorter video to edit, but this takes years to be ready. The last thing I don´t like is that the software stops working out of the blue some times.
Movie Maker uses a very simple version of standard video editor timeline along with clips which are represented by “long thumbnails”. The thumbnail tracks provide options to show the audio waveforms along the bottom, such that you can where are the quiet and loud parts of your video. You also get five different size choices for the thumbs, along with zoom control at the bottom to let you stretch out these clip representation. You can easily trim and split clips by using the cursor insertion point combined with available edit buttons.
Cyberlink is often the first to roll out new and innovative tools and features. For example, it pioneered multi-cam functionality for consumer-level software. That technology was previously only found in professional programs like Adobe Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro. Cyberlink’s basics are also top-notch. This program has a 99-track timeline, which gives nearly unlimited versatility. You can make simple videos quickly but also delve deeply into complex projects. You may never edit a feature film with this software, but it is more than capable of that task. In our ease-of-use tests, PowerDirector earned an A. Our reviewers noted that the interface is intuitive, the tools are accessible, and even the most advanced features are simple to learn. You can unlock the fullest potential of the program easily if you learn how to use the tools properly.
Another program, VSDC Video Editor Pro, simply has too outdated an interface, making common tasks difficult. Longtime pro video editors will note the absence of Avid Media Composer, which is simply too unwieldy for PCMag's primarily consumer audience. There are a couple of more interesting applications—NCH VideoPad and AVS Video Editor among them—that we simply haven't tested yet.

I purchased this product last weekend and love it so much, I'm buying a second copy later this week! I teach college and my summer project is to put all my lectures on Powerpoint. I hate learning new software and don't have the time for a drawn out learning curve. It took me minutes to set this up, and another hour or so to discover that this actually does almost everything I need (a phone call this afternoon to the tech help desk which kept me on hold for less than five minutes--a resonable wait in my opinion--explained that I couldn't do what I asked about. But I can do everything I need as far as audio goes, I can record decent video via VCR, and the television image I can monitor with software on my 'puter screen is actually clearer than on my television monitor (albeit much smaller). So I'm happy enough to try another copy (for work). I suppose in another year or so something better will come out, but for the casual video-editor who doesn't want to pour over tech specs, this is great!

The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.

Windows Movie Maker is a free video creator that is probably already installed on your computer since it is included in Windows Essential 2012, and if it is not, you can easily download it on www.windows.microsoft.com. This software is very easy to use, you only have to import photos or videos on your computer from any device, your flash drive, your camera or your phone. Your photos will appear in your Photo Gallery once you import them and later you can use them when you will make your movie in Movie Maker. You can also record a video from your webcam and add it to the Movie Maker. Movie Maker will let you create professional movie with transition, special effects and music.
First, I already kind of mentioned, but the grid view inside the viewfinder, they should give you options and the "thirds" grid should definitely be an option as the "rule of thirds" is a very good guide to follow in the absence of a clearer way to frame a photo. I hope in their future cameras they will have this. Or if somehow a firmware upgrade could add this, I'm not sure how hard-wired this grid is in the viewfinder if moving the lines would even be possible through software...

One of the cheaper options around ($49.99), Nero Video holds its own on this list—it comes well-stocked with a lot of the tricks and effects you’ll find among other products vying for video editing supremacy, and as far as software for beginners, you can certainly do worse. If you’re going to spend money learning how to edit videos, however, you might want to steer clear. Nero just doesn’t have the speed and functionality of some of the other products listed here, and if it’s value proposition is its price, $50 is still not all that cheap.  
Also, you can't leave it powered for too long at a time. I have noticed that if I record small clips for 1.5+ hours then the number of frames that drop increase dramitically, and I have to unplug it to let it cool down. If you want to record voice, it only records voice that comes through the speakers of your television (meaning, if you're recording voice on xbox, go to preferences and set voice to "speaker only" or "Both Headset & Speaker"); however, sound effects of blasts and explosions of games come through very well. The quality of voice recording is pretty bad, but I didn't buy this for voice recording, I bought it for video.
It´s a pleasure that Windows Movie Maker is really easy to use. What I mostly love about this free software is that it allows me to drag and drop pieces of videos that I have inside it, and then it lets me edit them and join them easily. I also love the upper menu that allows me to add text, music, and even effects (such as HQ video image and Black and White "textures"), by only clicking once on the desired option. I really think that editing videos is super easy when I use Windows Movie Maker.
Windows Movie Maker was once the world's most popular free video editing tool for Windows and users can make home movies by simple drag-and-drop. It contains features such as video effects, video transitions, adding titles/credits, audio track, timeline narration, and Auto Movie. Although Windows Movie Maker is built for Windows 7, and if you are looking for some free video editing software for Windows 8 or Windows 10, then you should skip Windows Movie Maker. However, Windows Movie Maker has been discontinued by Microsoft, you can still find installation packages on some third-party authoritative download sites:
Animaker is a Las Vegas, NV based, Fastest Growing, Do-It-Yourself, animated visual content creation platform on cloud. With the world’s largest library of animated assets, Animaker helps over a million users from 180 countries. Animaker users create visual content of studio quality, in quicktime, in any language & without much training or external guidance. Enterprises use it to convert boring financial data into visually appealing Infographic Videos. Entrepreneurs use it to convert lifeless textual content into exciting 2D Animated Explainer Videos. Students use it to create visually appealing Presentation Videos. Millennials use it to create fun filled Vertical Videos (Mobile).

Worst program I have ever used in my life. Randomly freezes, very picky with files, cant open the program if I close a video, cant save it as a movie... Icould go on. I looked up tons of things to try to fix this, and nothing works. I almost killed someone after how raged I was when I tried deleting the scene that kept freezing, but all that happened was a new scene would start freezing. Look for a different free program to downlaod.
Slightly different from the league is Dvolver.com which is a set up providing moviemaking services. Dvolver organizes online film festival ‘Dfilm’ that gives opportunity to the users to make their own digital films. Dfilm has cartoon based software as well which is fun to use. It allows friends and family to chat and talk through cell phones via SMS, MMS, instant messaging and others.
There are times when you don't want to share your video with the entire world. Burning a disc of your video is an excellent way to finish and personalize your creation. PowerDirector comes with several menu templates, but it also allows you to build custom menus. You can add chapters to your videos as well as features such as subtitles for the hearing impaired. You can create a disc for any purpose, whether it be as a gift for family, a screener for an independent film or a professional presentation for colleagues.

The simplest way to create a digital movie in Movie Maker is to add your clips to the timeline and choose one of the seven AutoMovie Themes—Default, Contemporary, Cinematic, Fade, Pan and Zoom (best used with photos), Black and White, and Sepia. It's nowhere near as extensive a set of options you'll see in iMovie, let alone Adobe Premiere Elements, but they're in simple good taste. These are displayed as thumbnails in the center of the Home ribbon. They add an intro title screen, transitions, and credits to the production.
4) As some other reviewers have pointed out, the Dazzle chip is not a HD device. Even though Dazzle Video Creator Plus HD is it's name, it does not record HD video. This is because S-video and component (the two types of ports on the capture card) are not capable of recording in HD quality. What HD refers to is Pinnacle Studio's ability to edit and render HD video.
Finally, we used each program to compress a 4K video file into a smaller resolution. We then examined the results looking for imperfections in the picture such as compression artifacts, motion blur, distortion, ghosting and more. PowerDirector’s results were simply outstanding. We could find almost no indication that the video had been compressed, even when viewed on an ultra-high-definition monitor.
Like iMovie, Movie Maker uses a simplified version of the standard video editor timeline, with clips represented by "long thumbnails." The first frame is shown at full contrast, while the following ones are faded, in a distinction between this look and iMovie's. The thumbnail tracks optionally show you the audio waveforms along the bottom, so you can see where the loud and quiet parts of your video lay. You get five size choices for the thumbs, which is probably enough, and a zoom control at the bottom lets you stretch out these clip representations. You can trim or split clips using the cursor insertion point combined with edit buttons. It's quite easy once you get used to the unique editing system used by the app: you click at a point in your clip, and can then drag the resulting insertion line around the timeline.
Added features such as time remapping for including slow motion, high-speed effects or freeze action are complemented by easily grouping or ungrouping clips on a timeline to edit in bulk or one at a time. With over 1,500 customizable effects, transitions and titles, there’s something for everyone. Even as the video itself is the focus, custom fitting your project with a soundtrack is handled well with custom-fit audio allowing your movies to both look and sound good.

One of the cheaper options around ($49.99), Nero Video holds its own on this list—it comes well-stocked with a lot of the tricks and effects you’ll find among other products vying for video editing supremacy, and as far as software for beginners, you can certainly do worse. If you’re going to spend money learning how to edit videos, however, you might want to steer clear. Nero just doesn’t have the speed and functionality of some of the other products listed here, and if it’s value proposition is its price, $50 is still not all that cheap.  
Taking a vacation this summer to the shore, overseas, a theme park, or somewhere exotic, like Cleveland? There's a good chance you're going to want to film some of your trip. But instead of letting it languish on your smartphone, DSLR or compact camera, you'll want to polish it up to share with family and friends. That's where a good video editing program comes in.
I make videos and brochures for a living, and one of the tolos I frequently use is Windows Movie Maker. There are two things I like about this software: first and foremost, is really easy to use: you can find all of the features easily on the user panel and add them with only one click, which is a pretty cool feature. The other thing I like is that adding music, credits, black and white effects, and many more additions to make your video creation more beautiful is also a piece of cake.
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