With light features also comes a light footprint, and Avidemux takes up little space compared to the other programs in our roundup. It also allows users to change extensions and select individual output formats when they’re finished editing a video, but the less-than-friendly interface makes it difficult to utilize the more intricate features and worthwhile tools. It may remain a bit buggy and prone to crashing, but the program’s defaults still work as intended, making Avidemux a standout choice once you’ve learned your way around the software. Just remember to save your work.
Wondershare Filmora supports a wide range of video formats, including .MP4, .AVI, .MOV, .AVCHD and many more. It also enables you to crop, trim, cut, split and even combine footage with a few easy clicks of the mouse. What's more, it also provides various filters and visual effects to help you touch up your video. Currently, there are more than 300 builtin effects available, and you can find more effects on Filmora Effects Store.
I have been using this software for quite a long time and the thing I like the most is how simple it is to use. The coolest thing is that I can get titles, subtitles and even give credits to my video work with just one click, YES! ONE CLICK! One more thing is that making your videos more exciting is as easy as adding songs to any of the frames you have so that you can give different types of moods to different parts of your video. This software is very complete.

For our speed comparison, we tested all of the Windows and cross-platform video editing software  on an HP Spectre x360 convertible laptop running Windows 10 Home. The laptop's 64-bit Intel Core i5 processor, with a 5200U CPU, runs at 2.2 GHz on an Intel HD Graphics 5500 system and has 8GB of RAM. We tested iMovie on a MacBook Air (late 2013) with a 1.7-GHz Intel Core i7 processor, Intel HD Graphics 5000 and 8GB of RAM, and running macOS Sierra v. 10.12.1.


I am a total beginner at editing, but I understand programs quite fast. To make a simple video was no big deal, also the tools like audio capture and screen capture are nice to have and you do not need extra programs for it. As it goes for the free solution it is just great. I also think the company philosophy for providing a free edition is great in this point.
The Powershot GX 3 I purchased to backup my EOS 7D Mark II didn't work out because of the steep drop-off in IQ. I decided to give the EOS M6 a try after reading up on mirrorless cameras, and noting that the M6 sports an APS-C sensor. I took it for a shoot at a botanical garden the day after receiving it, and I'm generally pleased with the results. I shot mainly with the EF-M 18-150mm lens, and I made sparing use of the EF-M 11-22. Both lenses produced some decent shots, and they kept the overall size and weight of my gear down. I've humped the 7DMKII with a Sigma 50-150mm lens, and I'm inclined to forgive a small dropoff in IQ in return for a much smaller, lighter kit. The M6 may struggle to backup to the 7DMKII for action shots. The 7DMKII focuses more quickly and rattles off 10 frames in the blink of an eye. That said, the M6 did a creditable job of capturing a macro shot of a flower-hopping Bumble Bee (photo attached). It's going to take time to get used to using the tilt screen instead of a viewfinder for composing shots, but it became more comfortable the more I shot. Bright sunlight is a challenge, but not an insurmountable one. The tilt screen also helped in framing close to the ground shots without having to dig my knees in the dirt. Time will tell, but first impressions of the M6 are quite positive.
Other recent features include a basic audio editor, the option to make previews for apps you’ve developed, and the even ability to make your own movie trailers complete with transitions and end credits. It’s not a tour de force in terms of video editing, but it’s perfectly suitable for home videos and minor projects. Consider combining it with free audio recording software!
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