There are the times when you just want to edit a video -- no fancy collages and no splicing. For that, there's InShot, a handy app that lets you trim, speed up, or add music and filters to video. It's pretty fundamental, but with that comes a high ease of use. You can also add a background, if you like, though we think it's pretty cool to have an overlap of images, like we did with the video below.
This video editor gives you tons of control and editing power, but you'll have to know how to use it. The program could use a manual to help novice users comb through all of the features. Without that, VSDC Free Video Editor will take a lot of experimenting or previous editing know-how to figure out. It's worth spending plenty of time with, though.

Then, along comes the EOS M5 and M6. I was reluctant to take the plunge due to slow-focusing issues I'd read about. I wanted the smallest possible camera but very high quality. Then, I read that the M6 has a nearly identical APS-C sensor to the new 80D - which has even better dynamic range than my 7D Mii. Then, I thought "but it doesn't have a viewfinder." Well, heck, I take photos all the time with my phone. So, I ordered the M6 with the 15-45 kit lens. I took many test photos. The camera is very easy to work with and I was pleased with the results. Compared to my previous Canon glass, M-lenses are tiny, but they're sharp. Plus, any small faults can be corrected in software. I don't really miss the viewfinder but there is one available to attach to the hot shoe. The controls are intuitive and the touchscreen is a joy to use. Manual exposure is easy to dial in quickly.


This video editor gives you tons of control and editing power, but you'll have to know how to use it. The program could use a manual to help novice users comb through all of the features. Without that, VSDC Free Video Editor will take a lot of experimenting or previous editing know-how to figure out. It's worth spending plenty of time with, though.

The other advantage of having an APS-C camera is your lens selection. Obviously you get to choose between both EF and EF-S lenses, but that's not what I mean by it. Canon has a very wide selection of EF lenses and you will read a lot about what lenses are great and what lenses are not so great. Well, the faults with the "not so great" lenses typically happen toward the outer edges. That's typically where the complaints would be while the center of the image will generally be good across almost all of Canon's quality EF lens selection. Well, since the APS-C sensor "crops" the image out of the center, you effectively crop out the "bad" parts of even the so-called "bad" lenses. So actually a lot of these lenses that get bad reviews, if you use them on an APS-C camera such as the T7i, you will never notice the faults people complain about with those lenses. I mean, this isn't ALWAYS the case, but if you read the consensus is that the outer parts of the image have distortion or is too dark while the center is fine, you likely would not notice those problems, or will notice them a lot less, while using the T7i combined with that lens.


Your audience is the strangest creature in the world. They can spend all day long keeping refreshing their newsfeed with no purposes. But they’ll rarely be patient enough to watch a 2-minute video if they’re not attracted in some first seconds. They will cruelly scroll by your effort-consuming without giving you another chance. So the question is how to capture their attention right at the beginning? And that’s why you need to read my Intro Video Creator Review now!

For the amateur video editor, all the functionality that's available can be a bit overwhelming. But if you're looking to produce truly professional-quality video -- without having to deal with watermarks -- Blender is a solid option. The best part: "You are free to use Blender for any purpose, including commercially or for education," according to its website. For the fine print, check out its licensing info.
Windows' included video editing software is all about simplicity: There's really no simpler way to combine your clips into digital movies with titles, transitions, background music, and effects. In earlier releases, the program was so simple that it wasn't capable of doing things people commonly needed, but little by little, stuff like voiceover recording and even anti-shake have made their way into what is now a very useful free app for digital video editing. Let's be clear, Movie Maker still lacks a lot of effects and tools you get in Apple's entry-level video editor, iMovie, not to mention enthusiast-level products like Adobe Premiere Elements or CyberLink PowerDirector, but for basic needs and ease of use, it hits the mark.
The swivel LCD is another great feature, although not new, my T3i had it, but still worth a mention. One difference, think starting with the T6i, is the LCD is now also a touchscreen. Although I turned mine off because I don't want to accidentally change anything since a lot of things can touch the screen, from my hands to my nose... I'd rather use the buttons which have a lot less chance of accidental activation. But I know everyone has been conditioned to love touchscreens, so it's there, hooray. :-)

Worst program I have ever used in my life. Randomly freezes, very picky with files, cant open the program if I close a video, cant save it as a movie... Icould go on. I looked up tons of things to try to fix this, and nothing works. I almost killed someone after how raged I was when I tried deleting the scene that kept freezing, but all that happened was a new scene would start freezing. Look for a different free program to downlaod.
Tech support and documentation: One of the big distinctions between paid and free software is the level of documentation and tech support; paid software has more-explicit and -detailed documentation and guides than the free versions. That said, many software packages post instructional videos of the most popular features to YouTube, and more-complex free packages may offer extensive documentation.
Free video editing software often comes with legal and technical limitations, however. Some widely used codecs require licensing fees on the part of the software maker, meaning they can't offer free software that can handle these standard file formats. That said, the impressive open-source Shotcut does a lot of the same things that the paid applications in this roundup do, including things like chroma-keying and picture-in-picture. Shotcut is completely open-source and free, while another free option, Lightworks has paid options that remove a 720p output resolution limit. Note also that both Shotcut and Lightworks run on Linux as well as Windows and Mac.

When it comes to user-friendliness, sophisticated features and ways to output your video, nothing beats the cross-platform Adobe Premiere Elements. With genuinely inspiring but practical features, Elements’ new video collage, audio remix, enhanced face detection, haze removal and adjustment layers focus on what consumers need every day. Its companion Organizer app keeps assets organized and searchable, and the touch-friendly interface works quite well in Windows 10.

If you are familiar with Windows software, Movie Maker has a lot of functionality - and if you know where to look. The product has a small learning curve if you want to do simple tasks like edit video length or add audio. You can simply drop in video and the interface can easily be navigated. You can save video into different formats or extract audio with ease.
I am a total beginner at editing, but I understand programs quite fast. To make a simple video was no big deal, also the tools like audio capture and screen capture are nice to have and you do not need extra programs for it. As it goes for the free solution it is just great. I also think the company philosophy for providing a free edition is great in this point.

The best advice I can gie you is that you need to solve the issue that appears when you merge images with videos. Let me be clearer with this: if you use the merging effect (for intros and outros) and you use this option when you marge the last part of the video with a new image placed at the end of the same video, the moment when the video is blurring and the image appears, you can see half of the image on the top of the screen, and half of the video on the bottom of the screen. This only happens when you use this option at the end of your work,
Despite being the cheapest option on this list, Corel Video Studio Pro X6 is simple to use without sacrificing power. Features such as motion tracking for moving effects, even better stop motion controls, an enhanced screen capture utility and a subtitle editor with voice detection make this a low-risk purchase for amateur videographers who still want quality.
Remember, if you are looking for a video editing software, this is not it. This is simple cut, drag, paste, add transitions kind of work. It will do great for a presentation or slideshows you would like to create, but it will not be the one you want to make an actual film or quality videos. If you like the user interface of it, try teaming it up with other video editors to give you a better chance at reaching your vision with your project! I have connected it with all of the Microsoft office programs, VSDC, Pinnacle Pro, and iMovie to create better looking projects with the same easy interface!

The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.


Entertainment Software Screensavers & Wallpaper Internet Software Business Software Games Educational Software Graphic Design Software Communications Utilities & Operating Systems Developer Tools Browsers Home Software Productivity Software Desktop Enhancements Security Software Networking Software iTunes & iPod Software Travel
Adding and arranging: When you're ready to make a movie, your first step will be to choose what type of files to add. Options include Video, Audio, Image, Icon, and Lyric. You can add any and all of these to the same project and then move them around on the Timeline until you have them where you want them. And if you're new to this type of program, there's a convenient Movie Wizard to guide you through the process. 
×