Clinton directs and shoots videos for Stark Insider. Recent projects include BTS short LUZIA with Cirque du Soleil, short film collection WHO IS STARK INSIDER?, and art-doc WRONG'S WHAT I DO BEST shot on location at the San Francisco Art Institute. His Broadway shorts, such as SHREK UNMASKED, have garnered acclaim. He's worked with DreamWorks, Disney on Ice, and "studied under" filmmaker Werner Herzog. He also writes on Stark Insider about the San Francisco arts scene, Napa, Silicon Valley and gadgets including camera gear. More about Clinton Stark: Bio | IMDB | Gear List

This is an excellent question, and it has a simple and short answer: I make and edit videos with it, so that I can sell them and earn money. My industry is the freelance world for music and video, thus, if there´s software that allows me to make and edit videos quickly, then this software will be one of the main tools for my business, and this is the reason why Movie Maker is a vital piece for my business that allows me to handle most of my video needs.


Hitfilm Express 9's high-energy style appeals to budding filmmakers who want to put a special touch on a personal event or get creative with a video blog, but it's still easy enough for the adventurous friends-and-family crowd. The one concession you have to make is that you have to give the software maker a shout out on social media in order to download the free app.
It´s a pleasure that Windows Movie Maker is really easy to use. What I mostly love about this free software is that it allows me to drag and drop pieces of videos that I have inside it, and then it lets me edit them and join them easily. I also love the upper menu that allows me to add text, music, and even effects (such as HQ video image and Black and White "textures"), by only clicking once on the desired option. I really think that editing videos is super easy when I use Windows Movie Maker.
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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