I got this last week and have been transferring 10 to 20+ year old VHS and VHS-c movies to the computer. That is probably all I will ever use it for but it is doing a good job for me. Installed easily (Win 7 64 bit) and the editing software is good enough. I am just doing basic stuff. Splitting the video up by date and/or size (to keep it less than 2GB per file).

In the production industry, when most people think about editing software, their minds don't go to Windows Movie Maker on a PC. I'm not an expert on how to achieve that, but I gather a revamped look (which seems more like a professional editing suite) that retains the intuitive, user-friendly feel would be a start. The issue may not be with Movie Maker, but more so a computer's ability to handle the rich files (raw video) and storage required to edit.

Another great advanced tool found in PowerDirector Ultra is the multi-cam module. This allows you to import footage of an event taken from multiple sources, sync them up and then switch between angles easily. The result is a seamless single video that has the look and feel of a professionally produced piece. This is especially useful for events that have been recorded on several smartphones.


Speaking about Autofocus, lets now talk about that new dual pixel autofocus. This has been a feature in the higher end 70d, 80d and 7D Mark 2 cameras and is one of my favourite features. A few years ago, getting good autofocus in video with a DSLR was un heard of, but now with this new system it works great. So I was reall happy when the t7i included it. So how well does it work?
Nothing makes an impression like moving images with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—smartphones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with new formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding), 360-degree VR video, and 4K and above.

Another thing I don't like is how they decided to "encode" their batteries. I'm sure there's some advantage to it, most likely safety to ensure you're using a genuine Canon battery they can quality control, but how it's affected me is that now buying an aftermarket battery means that you won't get a read-out of how much power you have left while using them. Not a huge deal, but it is kind of annoying. I like to have spare batteries, but at almost $60 a pop, no way I can afford to have a genuine Canon one. So I'll have to live with one made by a 3rd party and not knowing how much power is left in it if I have to use it... It also means the Canon charger will refuse to charge these batteries, so the 3rd party charger will be required to charge up these 3rd party batteries...


Lightworks is free video creating software that has been used from some of the best editors in the world with support for all major broadcast formats. This software will give you everything you need to make your movie great. This software works on all three platforms, so, no matter if you are using Windows, Linux or Mac OS X you can still work on this software. You can download it on www.lkws.com. If you use Lightworks for as a video creator you will be able to import, render or export without any problems or delays. You can continue editing while you are importing new material. Not only that Lightworks supports the three main platforms, it also supports the hardware of the main manufacturers. This software also offers the a very powerful trim functions, which will make the editing fast and easy. It also offers powerful and real time effects. It has over 100 inbuilt effect presets. Your video files are already made for all the popular social media. There is also an option to upload your video on your YouTube account. The best side of this application is that it is the fastest application ever.
Even though Windows Movie Maker has a wide variety of special effects, some of them look a little tacky when implemented. Especially if you use a lot of them within a short span of one video. Also, a great feature of Windows Movie Maker is that you can add subtitles to your video. The problem is that this can become a little tedious when you have to manually put them in.
In experienced hands, the VSDC Free Video Editor can produce some seriously professional-looking video. In addition to supporting nearly every major video format, the program offers advanced video effects, including object transformation and color correction, as well as advanced audio effects like volume correction and sound normalization. And unlike WeVideo, the VSDC Free Video Editor is truly free. You can use the program's full feature set without having to deal with pesky watermarks.
Trusted by 250+ exceptional customers across the world including Duke University, the University of Nebraska, Mortenson Construction, NBC, and General Electric, ilos is the fastest growing interactive video platform for business and higher education. ilos is the most simple yet robust video platform on the market, enabling video makers to record, edit, share, and host interactive videos within one app. Built on the newest technology stack, the ilos platform is miles ahead of legacy video services. What sets ilos apart from other video platforms? Intuitive for Non-Video Professionals: Empower every member of your organization to make professional-level videos, regardless of their video experience level. Interactive Video: Easily add in-video quizzing and live commenting to videos to transform passive viewers into active learners. Guest Record: Crowdsource content directly from your SMEs, students, or customers, with just the click of a button. Rapid Record: Record personalized videos at scale for sales prospects or members of your organization. Admin Control: Control LMS integrations, video analytics, user profiles and more within you ilos dashboard.
Support for 4K video source content has become pretty standard in video editing software, but the support varies among the products. For example, some but not all of the applications can import Sony XAVC and XAVC-S formats, which are used by Sony's popular DSLRs, mirrorless cameras, camcorders, and professional video cameras. The same holds true for the H.265 High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. Most of the applications here now can import and export HEVC, though there are still a few holdouts.
Worst program I have ever used in my life. Randomly freezes, very picky with files, cant open the program if I close a video, cant save it as a movie... Icould go on. I looked up tons of things to try to fix this, and nothing works. I almost killed someone after how raged I was when I tried deleting the scene that kept freezing, but all that happened was a new scene would start freezing. Look for a different free program to downlaod.
Michael Muchmore is PC Magazine's lead analyst for software and web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazine's coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of web services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazine's S... See Full Bio
However, simple editing can be done on the cheap if you’re willing to ditch powerful, high-end software such as Final Cut Pro, or Adobe Premiere, in favor of a more modest program. Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to be taking home the Palme d’Or with the film you cut on your laptop, but your home movies and YouTube uploads can take on a whole new shine with a few straightforward tools.
If you are familiar with Windows software, Movie Maker has a lot of functionality - and if you know where to look. The product has a small learning curve if you want to do simple tasks like edit video length or add audio. You can simply drop in video and the interface can easily be navigated. You can save video into different formats or extract audio with ease.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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