Do you think it’s possible to build a blog from scratch, outsourcing the work from day one (assuming I have some cash that can cover the initial expenses until the blog generates enough income to at least break even)? In other words, do you think you could you have spent your $500 max per month for the writer, social media expert, etc to build your blog to the point it’s earning the same amount of money it does now?
However, you should pick a niche and blog about that. If you're launching a money related blog, maybe it'll be about how to make money in real estate or simply how to make money online. Pick the niche and stick to it. If it's a diet and fitness related blog, maybe the niche is the Ketogenic diet, the Atkins diet or some other form of diet or fitness.
1. The batting cage idea is very risky. I’ve seen many of them close over the years and it is not anything close to passive income if you want to keep the business going. You have to continually promote it and target youth leagues, coaches, schools etc to catch all of the new players who grow up and want to play. I’ve played at probably 8 batting cages over the years and 7 of them closed.

passive income ideas


EQ Bank Savings Plus Account 2.45%*-This is one of the highest rates in Canada.  There are no fees, no minimum balance, you get UNLIMITED FREE INTERAC e-TRANSFERS® (my usual bank charges me over $2 each e-transfer!).  There is no physical branch, it is all done online.  It is a trademark of Equitable Bank, which is a Canadian bank that has over $23 billion assets under management.  The maximum balance is $200,000, which is a good problem to have if you have more than that to plunk in a savings account 😉 (they recently increased it from $100,000).  Rates are of course subject to change without notice, so better act fast.  Here’s my review of EQ Bank, I recently signed up.

However, when you lack the money, you need time. You'll need to invest the upfront time now in order to reap the benefits of automatic income later. It just doesn't happen overnight. So don't expect it to. However, you can do this without quitting your day job. All it takes is some sincere effort over a consistent period, and voila! But, to get there, you'll need to consistently burn the midnight oil or get up at the crack of dawn. Your choice.


1. The batting cage idea is very risky. I’ve seen many of them close over the years and it is not anything close to passive income if you want to keep the business going. You have to continually promote it and target youth leagues, coaches, schools etc to catch all of the new players who grow up and want to play. I’ve played at probably 8 batting cages over the years and 7 of them closed.

passive income ideas


The robo-advisor company charges a 0.50% fee and on top of that there the fee charged for the ETFs (which is anywhere from 0.25 to 0.5% as well).  Robo-advisor companies help you rebalance your money automatically so your original asset allocation is preserved.  Basically, you can be completely hands off and all you need to do is funnel your money in there and they will invest it for you.

passive income real estate


Well, it might become passive income once you get the blog established.  However, before that happens it is a lot of work to write content, promote your content and market your content, and check your page views in an obsessive-compulsive manner throughout the day.  Even then, you will likely need to continue writing content so that people continue to visit your blog.
Passive income is earnings derived from a rental property, limited partnership, or other enterprise in which a person is not actively involved. As with active income, passive income is usually taxable. However, it is often treated differently by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Portfolio income is considered passive income by some analysts, so dividends and interest would therefore be considered passive. However, the IRS does not always agree that portfolio income is passive, so it’s wise to check with a tax professional on that subject.
The United States Internal Revenue Service categorizes income as active income, passive income, or portfolio income.[1] It defines passive income as only coming from two sources, or "passive activities": rental activity or "trade or business activities in which you do not materially participate."[2][3] Other financial and government institutions also recognize it as an income obtained as a result of capital growth or in relation to negative gearing. Passive income is usually taxable.
The United States Internal Revenue Service categorizes income as active income, passive income, or portfolio income.[1] It defines passive income as only coming from two sources, or "passive activities": rental activity or "trade or business activities in which you do not materially participate."[2][3] Other financial and government institutions also recognize it as an income obtained as a result of capital growth or in relation to negative gearing. Passive income is usually taxable.

What means passive income?

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