The United States Internal Revenue Service categorizes income as active income, passive income, or portfolio income.[1] It defines passive income as only coming from two sources, or "passive activities": rental activity or "trade or business activities in which you do not materially participate."[2][3] Other financial and government institutions also recognize it as an income obtained as a result of capital growth or in relation to negative gearing. Passive income is usually taxable.
You don’t have to invest individually to take advantage of dividend paying stocks (i.e. investing in an ETF like DVY, which currently has a 3.16% dividend yield – almost 4%). And while your math is indeed correct, there is more to dividend paying stocks that just the math. The reason the companies pay dividends is typically because of their underlying strength, steady growth, etc. These companies can be good investments for the long run. As such, it might not make sense to sell.
Holly Johnson, a professional freelance writer who earns over $200,000 per year creating online content, is another successful entrepreneur who is doing well with course sales. Johnson launched her Earn More Writing freelance writing course in 2017 and has sold over 700 courses for $199 each since then. In January of 2019, she also launched a “Pro” version of her course that retails for $349. She sold 40 on the first day. 

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Rental properties are defined as passive income with a couple of exceptions. If you’re a real estate professional, any rental income you’re making counts as active income. If you’re “self-renting,” meaning that you own a space and are renting it out to a corporation or partnership where you conduct business, that does not constitute passive income unless that lease had been signed before 1988, in which case you’ve been grandfathered into having that income being defined as passive. According to the IRS’s Passive Activity and At-Risk Rules, “It doesn’t matter whether or not the use is under a lease, a service contract, or some other arrangement.”

What are the 7 streams of income?

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