Passive income is the Holy Grail for online marketers. It's automatic. Effortless. But, not at first. In the beginning, it's grueling. I liken this to doing the most amount of work for the least initial return. However, over time, as your passive income begins to increase, your reliance on an active income plummets. That's when the real magic starts to happen.

What is considered a passive activity?


This was my first foray into passive income.  Putting your money in a high-interest savings account is a great idea because it is safe and usually these are e-savings accounts so that they are a bit more difficult to access (e.g. you won’t be able to raid the ATM and withdraw all your savings to buy that pair of shoes you have been eyeing).  Which means that you’ll have less opportunity to meddle with your money, which means the money will be left untouched and left to grow with compound interest.

Certain posts that you create can work like passive income for you.  For example, if you have display advertising on your blog, then this is purely passive income, though you do need to keep creating content for returning visitors and subscribers.  It takes a long time before you can monetize a blog, at least 6 months.  This is why a lot of people drop out of blogging before 6 months, because it is a lot of hard work.
The United States Internal Revenue Service categorizes income as active income, passive income, or portfolio income.[1] It defines passive income as only coming from two sources, or "passive activities": rental activity or "trade or business activities in which you do not materially participate."[2][3] Other financial and government institutions also recognize it as an income obtained as a result of capital growth or in relation to negative gearing. Passive income is usually taxable.

What is the best passive income?


While these activities fit the popular definition of passive income, they don’t fit the technical definition as outlined by the IRS’s Passive Activity Losses—Real Estate Tax Tips. Passive income, when used as a technical term, is defined as either “net rental income” or “income from a business in which the taxpayer does not materially participate,” and in some cases can include self-charged interest. It goes on to say that passive income “does not include salaries, portfolio, or investment income.”

passive income meaning


Decide to invest in dividend stocks. Dividend stocks pay out a portion of the company's profits to shareholders. These dividends are paid at regular intervals, so they produce a regular income stream. Investors who hold a large amount of this type of stock are known as "income investors" because they prioritize regular dividends over stock value growth.[1]

How do I generate passive income?

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