With two babies, and deserted by my husband, I had no choice but to work for myself. At the beginning it was hard. However, I soon realized that this was the best thing to have ever happened to me. I struggled with EVERYTHING to begin with, but as I mastered new skills I began making a good living without even leaving the comfort of my own home. Now I wouldn’t change my lifestyle for the world.
I do agree that a few of these ideas are not bad, but for me the problem with some of these platforms has been that I’m not from the USA. So, I can’t operate there. It’s a really interesting possibility to get some extra bucks from doing what you would do either way, like shopping. One of the best projects so far that I have seen is FluzFluz. It’s simple and really easy to use for everyone who uses Uber, Amazo, or other apps. The best part of all is that you can get some passive income – not just from your own purchases, but from other people’s as well. I hope one day it will make it here to your list. I think it’s worth it to check out.
Wealthsimple is the largest robo-advisor company in Canada, and it has over $1.9 billion assets under management.  It is backed by Power Financial Corporation and was created right here in Canada (Toronto), thanks to the founder and CEO of Wealthsimple, Michael Katchen (who was only 29 years old when he got $37 million in funding from Power Financial to start up Wealthsimple).

Participate in royalty-based venture financing. In traditional venture financing, an investor buys a stake in a company to provide growth capital to its founders. This investor is then entitled to a percentage of the gains experienced when a company is bought or has an initial public offering. However, there is another kind of venture financing where an investor can invest start-up capital in exchange for regular royalty payments that are based on the company's revenue. This doesn't give the investor any ownership in the company, but does guarantee regular payouts (assuming the company survives).

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Andrew Fiebert is a thirty-something soon-to-be father of twins, a self-professed data nerd, and has worked as a Data Engineer for Barclays Capital and iHeartRadio. He's spent the past six years growing LMM into a multi-six-figure business with over 500 hours of free personal finance education that reaches over 1 million people every month. Andrew has a B.S. in Computer Science and has been featured in Quartz, Forbes, Business Insider, and The Telegraph.

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There are three main categories of income: active income, passive income, and portfolio income. Passive income has been a relatively loosely used term in recent years. Colloquially, it’s been used to define money being earned regularly with little or no effort on the part of the person receiving it. Popular types of passive income include real estate, peer-to-peer lendng (P2P), and dividend stocks. Proponents of earning passive income tend to be boosters of a work-from-home and be-your-own-boss professional lifestyle. The type of earnings people usually associate with this are gains on stocks, interest, retirement pay, lottery winnings, online work, and capital gains. 


While selling leads is a lot less lucrative than earning life insurance commissions, I realized over time that selling life insurance was way too much work. If I was going to keep things going, I would need to hire people, manage a team, and put in a lot of hours. I wasn’t really interested in doing any of that, which is why I opted to start selling leads instead. Now that I do, I’m bringing in passive income with hardly effort on my part.
You don’t have to invest individually to take advantage of dividend paying stocks (i.e. investing in an ETF like DVY, which currently has a 3.16% dividend yield – almost 4%). And while your math is indeed correct, there is more to dividend paying stocks that just the math. The reason the companies pay dividends is typically because of their underlying strength, steady growth, etc. These companies can be good investments for the long run. As such, it might not make sense to sell.

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While these activities fit the popular definition of passive income, they don’t fit the technical definition as outlined by the IRS’s Passive Activity Losses—Real Estate Tax Tips. Passive income, when used as a technical term, is defined as either “net rental income” or “income from a business in which the taxpayer does not materially participate,” and in some cases can include self-charged interest. It goes on to say that passive income “does not include salaries, portfolio, or investment income.”

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You don’t have to invest individually to take advantage of dividend paying stocks (i.e. investing in an ETF like DVY, which currently has a 3.16% dividend yield – almost 4%). And while your math is indeed correct, there is more to dividend paying stocks that just the math. The reason the companies pay dividends is typically because of their underlying strength, steady growth, etc. These companies can be good investments for the long run. As such, it might not make sense to sell.

What does passive income mean?


Earning passive income is great but it can be tough in the beginning to see how amazing passive income is. Usually your contributions dwarf your passive income at first. This can make it seem like earning passive income isn’t worth while. But if you stick with it then all of a sudden it starts to snowball. After about 3-5 years your passive income will start to equal 1-2 months of regular contributions. This is where things really start to pick up speed!

What is the best investment for monthly income?

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