While these activities fit the popular definition of passive income, they don’t fit the technical definition as outlined by the IRS’s Passive Activity Losses—Real Estate Tax Tips. Passive income, when used as a technical term, is defined as either “net rental income” or “income from a business in which the taxpayer does not materially participate,” and in some cases can include self-charged interest. It goes on to say that passive income “does not include salaries, portfolio, or investment income.”

The credit card bonuses and offers are not as good as the credit cards that our neighbours down south have, but they are still pretty good!  One of my favourites is the MBNA Rewards World Elite Mastercard and it is owned by TD Bank.  It is a straight up 2% cash back on all purchases.  I got it for free annually because I was grandfathered from another card (this no longer exists).
The robo-advisor company charges a 0.50% fee and on top of that there the fee charged for the ETFs (which is anywhere from 0.25 to 0.5% as well).  Robo-advisor companies help you rebalance your money automatically so your original asset allocation is preserved.  Basically, you can be completely hands off and all you need to do is funnel your money in there and they will invest it for you.

How do I generate multiple streams of income?


The United States Internal Revenue Service categorizes income as active income, passive income, or portfolio income.[1] It defines passive income as only coming from two sources, or "passive activities": rental activity or "trade or business activities in which you do not materially participate."[2][3] Other financial and government institutions also recognize it as an income obtained as a result of capital growth or in relation to negative gearing. Passive income is usually taxable.

What means passive income?

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