We installed each video editor on a Windows 10 PC running on an Intel Core i5 processor and an Nvidia dedicated graphics card. We used each suite to edit the same two videos: a 4K NASA video from inside the International Space Station, and a 1080p game capture video from Overwatch. We tested most of the filters and transitions in each suite, and cut the same edited versions of each video in each program. We then exported the videos to various file formats and media, as well as web services, to test output quality and speed. Where software offered a notable special feature not supported in the other products, we tested it when our hardware and software setup allowed it.
But you need to be prepared for situations as such as the SaaS vendor going out of business or their website going down. You need to have contingency procedures in place to combat these situations to make sure they do not have a harmful effect on your business. It is easy to subscribe to a SaaS solution, but think about the impact on your company if the platform is withdrawn by the provider.

Windows Movie Maker was once the world's most popular free video editing tool for Windows and users can make home movies by simple drag-and-drop. It contains features such as video effects, video transitions, adding titles/credits, audio track, timeline narration, and Auto Movie. Although Windows Movie Maker is built for Windows 7, and if you are looking for some free video editing software for Windows 8 or Windows 10, then you should skip Windows Movie Maker. However, Windows Movie Maker has been discontinued by Microsoft, you can still find installation packages on some third-party authoritative download sites:
Since each organization has specific business wants, it is sensible for them to abstain from searching for a one-size-fits-all perfect software solution. Needless to say, it would be pointless to try to find such a system even among widely used software applications. The intelligent thing to do would be to list the various vital elements that need consideration such as key features, budget, skill levels of staff members, company size etc. Then, you should do your research thoroughly. Read some Windows Movie Maker reviews and check out each of the other apps in your shortlist in detail. Such in-depth homework can make sure you weed out ill-fitting systems and zero in on the system that provides all the elements you need for business success.
For Those who see this Shotcut is a very good Truly Windows Movie Maker's Successor, for those who are beginners. Its fast, doesn't take long loading the video and more accurate & customizable than Windows Movie Maker its also up to date. NO TRIAL, ITS OPEN SOURCE, AND HAS THE ABILITY TO RECOVER YOUR WORK IF IT CRASHES http://filehippo.com/download_shotcut/ The things that are different from Windows Movie Maker - Adding Track via Timeline Menu (3 Stack Lines) - Adding Video and Audio to Timeline via Drag and Drop - Transitions via Overlap 2 Videoclip in Timeline - Changing Transitions via Click on Transition > Look Top Left for "Open File", "Save", "Undo", etc > Look for Properties > Below Transition is Video > Beside "Video" is a DropMenu with "Dissolve" > Click on it to change - You accurately move around with the Arrow Keys or Timebox - Double Click on video on Playlist to Play, Click on Video Clip in Timeline then Space to play
Clinton directs and shoots videos for Stark Insider. Recent projects include BTS short LUZIA with Cirque du Soleil, short film collection WHO IS STARK INSIDER?, and art-doc WRONG'S WHAT I DO BEST shot on location at the San Francisco Art Institute. His Broadway shorts, such as SHREK UNMASKED, have garnered acclaim. He's worked with DreamWorks, Disney on Ice, and "studied under" filmmaker Werner Herzog. He also writes on Stark Insider about the San Francisco arts scene, Napa, Silicon Valley and gadgets including camera gear. More about Clinton Stark: Bio | IMDB | Gear List

I have been using this software for quite a long time and the thing I like the most is how simple it is to use. The coolest thing is that I can get titles, subtitles and even give credits to my video work with just one click, YES! ONE CLICK! One more thing is that making your videos more exciting is as easy as adding songs to any of the frames you have so that you can give different types of moods to different parts of your video. This software is very complete.
Next getting the software to work was another challange. despite having a fast machine with a lot of RAM, I found the Movie Star program to be very unstable. I was able to capture up to 60 minutes of video and save it to the MPEG format, but everytime I tried to edit or export the video as Windows Media or Real, it crashed the machine. I downloaded a copy of Ulead's Video Studio, but couldn't figure out how to import MPEG files. I finally bit the bullet and wound up downloading a free 30-day trial of Adobe Premier. I found Premier to be a very stable and easy to use program. I just wish it didn't cost [so much!] /injects>
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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