Adding and arranging: When you're ready to make a movie, your first step will be to choose what type of files to add. Options include Video, Audio, Image, Icon, and Lyric. You can add any and all of these to the same project and then move them around on the Timeline until you have them where you want them. And if you're new to this type of program, there's a convenient Movie Wizard to guide you through the process.
The last downside, and perhaps the biggest one for some people, is the lack of 4K video recording. It's kind of a disappointment that phones can do it now but this DSLR still cannot. There are some comparably priced DSLRs from Nikon and others like Sony that have this feature. But honestly, even without this I will still prefer to stay with Canon simply because your camera is only as good as your lens, and Canon has probably the best lenses out there, but definitely without question has the widest selection of lenses to choose from.
You’ll find the familiar timeline/storyboard workflow, along with other basic tools such as titles and credits, effects and transitions, and a chroma-key (green screen). It also has some, but not all, of the advanced tools you need to make an outstanding video. You’ll get a video stabilizer to smooth out shaky footage, 4K compatibility for footage from the newest cameras, 3D editing, motion tracking and more. These are all great tools, and it’s a great bang for your buck. But there are some significant trade-offs. For example, there are no themes or templates. So, you’ll need to build every project from scratch – not very appealing to beginners. It also lacks an automatic video creator and slideshow creator, which are also great for novices. This program lacks multi-cam and 360-degree editing features that you would find on more expensive programs. If you want the newest, greatest effects and tools, this is not the program for you. In addition, the program’s interface is in bad need of a face-lift, and has been for years. It’s kind of hard to get around, and it will require working through a few projects before you can use it effectively.
For the amateur video editor, all the functionality that's available can be a bit overwhelming. But if you're looking to produce truly professional-quality video -- without having to deal with watermarks -- Blender is a solid option. The best part: "You are free to use Blender for any purpose, including commercially or for education," according to its website. For the fine print, check out its licensing info.
With light features also comes a light footprint, and Avidemux takes up little space compared to the other programs in our roundup. It also allows users to change extensions and select individual output formats when they’re finished editing a video, but the less-than-friendly interface makes it difficult to utilize the more intricate features and worthwhile tools. It may remain a bit buggy and prone to crashing, but the program’s defaults still work as intended, making Avidemux a standout choice once you’ve learned your way around the software. Just remember to save your work.
The simplest way to create a digital movie in Movie Maker is to add your clips to the timeline and choose one of the seven AutoMovie Themes—Default, Contemporary, Cinematic, Fade, Pan and Zoom (best used with photos), Black and White, and Sepia. It's nowhere near as extensive a set of options you'll see in iMovie, let alone Adobe Premiere Elements, but they're in simple good taste. These are displayed as thumbnails in the center of the Home ribbon. They add an intro title screen, transitions, and credits to the production.
Adobe Premiere Elements 2018 is perfect for people who want to make home movies to share with friends, but who don’t have much video editing experience. It offers decent functionality for more experienced editors who don’t want to follow the walk-throughs, but other, more robust software might be better if you’re a power user pursuing YouTube stardom.
The Dazzle Multimedia DM4100 Digital Video Creator is very useful to import video from your TV, VCR or DVD player into your PC for editing and then converting to PC video formats. The device is exceptionally good for making videos for use on the Web or as e-mail attachments. Thanks to its use of USB its very simple to install and can be "hot-swaped" with other USB device without rebooting your computer.
Filmora Video Editor for Windows (or Filmora Video Editor for Mac) is a popular video creator for new beginners as well. It contains all the features that a beginner need to create his or her videos. Basic editing features are: cropping, splitting, merging, trimming. Stabilizing videos is available if you think your footage is not great enough. Hand-picked motion graphics, filters, overlays, transitions, split scree, titles, and more will make your videos quite different and great. Now you can download the free trial version to see whether it is suitable for you or not.
For our speed comparison, we tested all of the Windows and cross-platform video editing software  on an HP Spectre x360 convertible laptop running Windows 10 Home. The laptop's 64-bit Intel Core i5 processor, with a 5200U CPU, runs at 2.2 GHz on an Intel HD Graphics 5500 system and has 8GB of RAM. We tested iMovie on a MacBook Air (late 2013) with a 1.7-GHz Intel Core i7 processor, Intel HD Graphics 5000 and 8GB of RAM, and running macOS Sierra v. 10.12.1.
However, it doesn’t have all the features and tools we look for in DVD makers, though it has enough to fit the needs of a novice. Before you can burn a DVD, you need to transform your raw footage into a compelling narrative. As such, this program’s video editing tools are its main selling points. It has a standard timeline/storyboard workflow – you compose the broad strokes of your video in the storyboard and fine-tune it in the timeline. One of the software’s biggest drawbacks is you only have eight editing tracks to build your project, and only one is dedicated to video. This limits the program’s versatility and hinders its ability to create complex projects. As a beginner, you might only need eight tracks; however, as you gain experience, it may become a frustration. In addition, the included DVD burner can’t add menus or chapter breaks.

We host professional development events for faculty members at our university and not everyone who is interested in each event is able to attend. With Movie Maker, we are taking our recordings of the live event, editing out the pre- and post-workshop conversations and any dead time during the event (i.e., individual activities), and making the recordings available to all faculty members (and graduate students). These events (both live and archived) are playing a role in increasing faculty members' activity and development.
When a customer asks me if I can finish editing any of the videos they´ll use for parties, proms, speeches, etc., I agree because I know I can get the job done with Movie Maker. Windows Movie Maker gives me the ability to give more life to videos by adding musical pieces; it also gives me the ability to make them more sophisticated by adding the director´s name and credits. These are some of the business benefits I get from Movie Maker: I make my clients happy.
The main problem we have in regards to training is knowledge transfer and simplifying training of processes when on-boarding new staff. We do have some videos created from other platforms but no way to share. As we are primarily a Windows shop, using Movie Maker allowed me to create training videos using Microsoft approved codecs and made it much easier to share videos with other team members. The main benefit of course is they can now get some training from the videos we've created and cost savings by not having them go to another facility or rely on other training tools.
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