You need a simple and efficient movie making and video editing app? You are making a family video after a vacation, a project presentation video at school, or a short video showcasing your product? HD Movie Maker - PRO is the most simple, efficient, and affordable video editing app for your need on Microsoft Store. HD Movie Maker - PRO helps you with making movies from your photos, video clips, and music. It provides the most basic features such as video trimming, video joining, photo clipping, to more advanced like video slow motion, image filter, transition effects. Main features are: - Make movies from video clips, photos - Trim, split, rotate, join video clips - Support most popular media formats: mp4, wmv, mkv, mov, avi, mpeg, mpg, mts, jpg, png, gif, mp3, m4a, wav - Up to 150 photos in a project (depending on hardware specification, video encoding time will increase with the number of photo) - Automatic transcoding for unsupported video codec (for some selected video codec) - Overlay text captions, emoticon, still PIP, sound clips on video clip - Adding title clips with text - Add text captions on photo - Animated pan-zoom for still photo - Photo enhancement filters - 30+ Transition effects (fade, ripple, cross-zoom, wave, pixelate, square wipe...) for photos and videos. - 30+ fashionable fonts for caption - Background music (built-in or from the user library) - Music editor with audio clip trimming, fading-in and fading-out effects - Adjust audio volume for video clips and background music - HD video quality Contact us at v3tapps@hotmail.com if you need help.
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.

It turns out that Windows Movie Maker is seriously lacking in the number of media formats available for saving your files – only four against dozens in the case of Movavi Video Editor Plus. Moreover, the Movavi app supports 4K video, which is definitely a huge advantage for those interested in handling videos in this resolution. The Intel® Media hardware acceleration is another neat feature that will make your working process a lot smoother if you go with Movavi.


The whole experience is geared around making it as easy as possible to turn your project into reality. There are two modes in this program: Easy and Full Feature. Easy mode guides you through the video editing process step by step. It’s a great way to familiarize yourself with the process. You can create some fine videos in this mode, but to really take advantage of Filmora’s wide toolset, you need to use the Full Feature Mode. This mode gives you access to tools from basic trimming and cropping to advanced features like picture-in-picture editing, audio mixer, chroma-key, split screen, video stabilization and much more. Filmora excels at teaching users to use these tools, and anyone with the patience to learn will find it useful. Filmora also has some of the best sharing options of the programs we reviewed. When you’re done with your project, you can export it to a file, upload it to YouTube (or other video-sharing site) or even burn a DVD.
One of iMovie’s most coveted features is its green-screen, or “chroma-key” tool, which allows you to place your characters in exotic locations—Hawaii, say—at a moment’s notice. Want to overlay the scene with “Somewhere Over the Rainbow”? iMovie ties directly in with iTunes and GarageBand, so you can easily implement custom tracks and sounds. When your movie’s finally ready to ship, release it into the wild using iMessage, Facebook, YouTube, or any other of iMovie’s succinctly connected platforms.
I won’t hide the fact that I’m a Canon fanboy. Canon just gets a lot of things right. Many of them are, in my books, the most important things, like great color science (images look beautiful and skin tones are rendered organically), the aforementioned stellar auto-focus (after all, what use is an out of focus photo or video?), and long battery life so you can shoot for hours without worry.
Tech support and documentation: One of the big distinctions between paid and free software is the level of documentation and tech support; paid software has more-explicit and -detailed documentation and guides than the free versions. That said, many software packages post instructional videos of the most popular features to YouTube, and more-complex free packages may offer extensive documentation.
Another thing I don't like is how they decided to "encode" their batteries. I'm sure there's some advantage to it, most likely safety to ensure you're using a genuine Canon battery they can quality control, but how it's affected me is that now buying an aftermarket battery means that you won't get a read-out of how much power you have left while using them. Not a huge deal, but it is kind of annoying. I like to have spare batteries, but at almost $60 a pop, no way I can afford to have a genuine Canon one. So I'll have to live with one made by a 3rd party and not knowing how much power is left in it if I have to use it... It also means the Canon charger will refuse to charge these batteries, so the 3rd party charger will be required to charge up these 3rd party batteries...
The T#i line is what they call a "pro-sumer" line, which is basically between a consumer line camera like a very basic DSLR and a professional DSLR camera, thus the term "pro-sumer." Typically what this meant is an DSLR with an APS-C sized sensor, decent resolution, and some hand-me-down professional features of pro-grade cameras from a few years ago. For this reason, sometimes it's not worth upgrading from one of these cameras to the next until at least a few generations have past (meaning if you have a T5i, it's not really a giant leap forward to upgrade to a T6i). However, the T7i is somewhat different. When I was doing research on what features it has and what it is missing compared to the pro-grade DSLRs that are considered "current" right now, I was surprised to find very little. The main differences really is that the pro-grade cameras have the LCD display on the top that would display all of your relevant camera settings, and then a few of them would also sport a full-frame sensor. Other than that, the differences are very minor. Something like maybe 1 or 2 frames less in burst mode or something like that. Nothing that would really jump out at you and make you regret not stepping up to the professional grade equivalent (Think it would be the 77D?). It actually has pretty much all of the big features of even their current pro-grade DSLRs, making the T7i probably one of the best prosumer DSLRs to buy.
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