The most basic way to produce a finished project is to export it as a video file. You can then use this file as a master copy of your video and keep it for archiving purposes. But you can also manually upload that file to various internet sites where it can be seen and shared. However, you can skip that step by uploading your finished project directly to YouTube, Facebook, and other sharing sites from within the program's interface. It allows you to input all the necessary information, metadata, descriptions and keywords to optimize your video so as many people see it as possible.
As easy as CyberLink makes this software to use, there may be times when you need help. To that end, the company established DirectorZone, a community of videographers, filmmakers and aspiring editors. This allows you to connect to, collaborate with and learn from other video makers. DirectorZone is a great resource for editors of all skill levels.
I sincerely believe that if you purchase any of these products that they will NOT work with a PS3 game system. I get the same thing that others get ... "no input signal" ... from the Pinnacle Studio 14 software included with the Dazzle. However I have the same software game for the PC, and despite TWO different capture attempts with other 3rd party software (which have no trouble capturing screen activities otherwise), the UbiSoft game could not be captured at all. Therefore, if you're using a PS3 and you want to capture your gameplay as video you'd better look elsewhere! I KNOW it can be done because the same game(s) ARE captured by others and you can see the videos on YouTube, so there must be a way. I just haven't found it here with the 'Dazzle'. Frankly, I'm not really dazzled by this hardware. Of interesting note there are two other video capture devices sold by Avid/Pinnacle, however they seem to contradict themselves with their Specifications Pages and Feature Pages. In one the Features says you can capture video from '... game systems and others...' however on the same device's Specifications page nowhere does it stipulate which gaming systems you can capture video from! In the other device it's just the reverse (i.e. Spec page says "... game systems...", and the Features page says nothing about gaming systems). Perhaps it's the PS3, or the Software Programs' video is encoded prohibiting captures? Who knows, perhaps this is a good product for video captures from other sources, but this just doesn't work for my PS3!
Finally, you'll want to pay attention to sharing capabilities. In the past, you only needed to worry about saving your videos to a DVD or a highly compressed video file, but the rise of Vimeo and YouTube has resulted in new sharing options. If you're looking to share your videos to your social network, make sure that your software is capable of doing so.
Final Cut Pro: Offers speed and power for the new generation of video editors. The latest edition boasts a clean new look and a low-profile interface that increases work space. An interesting feature is the improved Magnetic Timeline 2 feature that offers flexible layouts based on roles and automatic color coding. The latest release is ideal for the new MacBook Pro as it supports wide color workflows and the Touch Bar.

Every other program has dedicated tracks for each type of media such as video, audio, images, etc. The fact that you can use any media on any track makes this software much more dynamic and provides more control over your project. However, the DVD authoring tools in this program fall short of the best we tested. For example, you don’t get the ability add bonus features or save a disc image to your hard drive. While neither of these things are a deal-breaker, they’re both found in our top pick for this category.
Free video editing software often comes with legal and technical limitations, however. Some widely used codecs require licensing fees on the part of the software maker, meaning they can't offer free software that can handle these standard file formats. That said, the impressive open-source Shotcut does a lot of the same things that the paid applications in this roundup do, including things like chroma-keying and picture-in-picture. Shotcut is completely open-source and free, while another free option, Lightworks has paid options that remove a 720p output resolution limit. Note also that both Shotcut and Lightworks run on Linux as well as Windows and Mac.
Shooting and sharing videos has never been so easy, with a wide selection of mobile apps available to capture, edit and distribute your footage. Some are squeezed-down smartphone versions of powerful, desktop, video-editing software, while others are inventive new tools for the Instagram generation of social sharers. There are specialist video-making apps for special effects, stop-motion and even virtual reality film-making, and novelty apps to raise a smile with face swapping or retro filters. Here are 20 of the best apps to try in 2016, whatever your level of expertise.
For the first time ever… You’ll learn how to use Instagram to create a viral buzz for your products that are people who are going to go crazy for… See Instagram followers differ to Facebook users, since they will see every single post you write, bringing in traffic, and when you master a few golden never before seen secrets, you’ll be MILES AHEAD of the competition
There are tons of in-program effects such as transitions, titles, credits, captions and even included audio scores, meaning you won’t get held up at any step of your editing process. There are panning and shift capabilities, high-quality post-processing zoom, as well as a plethora of color filtering plugins to give you the look you’ll need, even if the raw footage isn’t quite there. You’ll have the ability to export your movies in up to 4K resolution, and the software even supports 360-degree video projects. It’s a great powerhouse for beginners.
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