VSDC Free Video Editor looks and feels just like a professional video editor. In fact, if feels almost identical to Final Cut Pro in a lot of ways. If you want to experience that style of in-depth video editing, this program is an epic way to do it for free. Be warned, though, that there's a steep learning curve unless you already have some experience.
Windows Movie Maker is a free video creator that is probably already installed on your computer since it is included in Windows Essential 2012, and if it is not, you can easily download it on www.windows.microsoft.com. This software is very easy to use, you only have to import photos or videos on your computer from any device, your flash drive, your camera or your phone. Your photos will appear in your Photo Gallery once you import them and later you can use them when you will make your movie in Movie Maker. You can also record a video from your webcam and add it to the Movie Maker. Movie Maker will let you create professional movie with transition, special effects and music.
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
Your audience is the strangest creature in the world. They can spend all day long keeping refreshing their newsfeed with no purposes. But they’ll rarely be patient enough to watch a 2-minute video if they’re not attracted in some first seconds. They will cruelly scroll by your effort-consuming without giving you another chance. So the question is how to capture their attention right at the beginning? And that’s why you need to read my Intro Video Creator Review now!
The Full Feature Editor contains simplified versions of nearly all the tools available in professional video editing software. For example, you have access to an audio mixer that lets you fine-tune your sound, the chroma key that allows you to create green-screen effects, and a surround-sound configurator that optimizes your video for home entertainment systems and even movie theaters. These tools and others allow you to make the same type of videos as Hollywood professionals. PowerDirector is a great program not only for creating great videos, but also for learning nonlinear editing in case you decide to upgrade to professional video editing programs.
I make videos and brochures for a living, and one of the tolos I frequently use is Windows Movie Maker. There are two things I like about this software: first and foremost, is really easy to use: you can find all of the features easily on the user panel and add them with only one click, which is a pretty cool feature. The other thing I like is that adding music, credits, black and white effects, and many more additions to make your video creation more beautiful is also a piece of cake.
There are two different licenses you can choose from with Lightworks: "Free" and "Pro." (The latter of which, as you might have guessed, requires that you cough up some cash.) The main difference between the two licenses is that the Pro version offers more features, including stereoscopic output and advanced project sharing. But the free version is still quite powerful, providing 100+ effects and supporting multicam editing.
One of the things that can be a pain in the neck is that if you're working with a long video, and you want to give different types of effects to different parts of this video, then you have to cut out the parts of that same video you need to change, and later, you need to apply the type of effect you want to each of these pieces of videos separately, and then save them like different files. After all that, you need to join them together. It would be lovely that there was an option to achieve this without so much work.

In the production industry, when most people think about editing software, their minds don't go to Windows Movie Maker on a PC. I'm not an expert on how to achieve that, but I gather a revamped look (which seems more like a professional editing suite) that retains the intuitive, user-friendly feel would be a start. The issue may not be with Movie Maker, but more so a computer's ability to handle the rich files (raw video) and storage required to edit.

One of the capabilities that has been making its way into consumer-level video editing software is support for LUTs (lookup tables), also known as CLUTs (color lookup tables). This staple of pro-level software lets you quickly change the look of a video to give it a specific mood. For example, think of the dark blue look of thriller movies like The Revenant. You can download LUTs for free from several sites or use those included with some video software to give your video a specific look. One well-known LUT type is the kind that can make a daytime scene look like it was shot at night.
Nothing makes an impression like moving images with sound. That's why digital video continues to grow in importance online. Couple that trend with the ever-increasing availability of devices capable of high-resolution video recording—smartphones, GoPros, DSLRs—and the case for ever more powerful video editing software becomes clear. Further, the software must be usable by nonprofessionals, and it has to keep up with new formats such as HEVC (High Efficiency Video Coding), 360-degree VR video, and 4K and above.
Both DaVinci and VSDC mix paid features in their basic programs, but they do not explicitly mark these features as such. However, if you try to use them, you'll get an error message and an ad. We can't fault the software companies for trying to get users on board with paid versions, but just be warned that such annoyances are the hidden cost of otherwise-free video apps.
I got this last week and have been transferring 10 to 20+ year old VHS and VHS-c movies to the computer. That is probably all I will ever use it for but it is doing a good job for me. Installed easily (Win 7 64 bit) and the editing software is good enough. I am just doing basic stuff. Splitting the video up by date and/or size (to keep it less than 2GB per file).

I like the simplicity of Windows Moviemaker. I like that the application can be used by a beginner in video editing. This application is perfect for splicing together slideshows and putting together home movies. It's pretty cool that you can also easily share your video. Furthermore, Moviemaker is versatile in that it allows the importation and exportation of a wide variety of file types.
The next advantage is something I already touched on earlier. The size and bulk. These prosumer line cameras are typically much smaller and lighter than their pro-grade cousins. However, I am now completely spoiled by USM lenses (specifically their new nano-USM system), and they are unfortunately bulkier than the "kit lenses" that typically come with these cameras. But overall even with the bulkier lenses, it'll still be much easier to move around with the T7i than with a 5D or a 1D...
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.
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