For the amateur video editor, all the functionality that's available can be a bit overwhelming. But if you're looking to produce truly professional-quality video -- without having to deal with watermarks -- Blender is a solid option. The best part: "You are free to use Blender for any purpose, including commercially or for education," according to its website. For the fine print, check out its licensing info.
On the nikon side you might looking at the Nikon D3400 or the Nikon D5600. Both of these cameras were released last year and they’re both very nice. The D5600 is the most similar and also has a fully articulating screen. If you’ve never used a nikon dslr before it might take you a little while to get used, but again both of these cameras are quite good although I would still give the advantage to the T7i.

For Those who see this Shotcut is a very good Truly Windows Movie Maker's Successor, for those who are beginners. Its fast, doesn't take long loading the video and more accurate & customizable than Windows Movie Maker its also up to date. NO TRIAL, ITS OPEN SOURCE, AND HAS THE ABILITY TO RECOVER YOUR WORK IF IT CRASHES http://filehippo.com/download_shotcut/ The things that are different from Windows Movie Maker - Adding Track via Timeline Menu (3 Stack Lines) - Adding Video and Audio to Timeline via Drag and Drop - Transitions via Overlap 2 Videoclip in Timeline - Changing Transitions via Click on Transition > Look Top Left for "Open File", "Save", "Undo", etc > Look for Properties > Below Transition is Video > Beside "Video" is a DropMenu with "Dissolve" > Click on it to change - You accurately move around with the Arrow Keys or Timebox - Double Click on video on Playlist to Play, Click on Video Clip in Timeline then Space to play

The software offer up to seven AutoMovie themes including contemporary, default, fade, cinematic, pan and zoom, sepia, and black & white. Although this collection is nowhere near the one offered by premium options, the themes are presented in simple, good taste. The editing options are quite limited, but its collection of effects is attractive and are applied with a single click.


We created, exported and reviewed all of the results. We watched every video we made, looking for imperfections in the video and audio. Flaws such as pixelation, compression artifact, motion blur and more were present in most of the videos we examined, but they varied greatly depending on which program we used. Each program was given an A to F quality grade based on this evaluation.
Every other program has dedicated tracks for each type of media such as video, audio, images, etc. The fact that you can use any media on any track makes this software much more dynamic and provides more control over your project. However, the DVD authoring tools in this program fall short of the best we tested. For example, you don’t get the ability add bonus features or save a disc image to your hard drive. While neither of these things are a deal-breaker, they’re both found in our top pick for this category.
Cyberlink PowerDirector 16 Ultra is a prosumer video editor that aims to bring every feature under the sun to a video editor that is accessible and affordable. There’s nothing else in this price range that brings you this many well-implemented features, especially in 360 video. Complexity is its one challenge: The user interface is not always self-explanatory, and the inclusion of so many features means it can be difficult to find what you want. Read our full review. 
We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
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